Spatial Connections (Part 2)

Space appears across the arts and humanities. Thinking beyond the boundaries of individual disciplines, this event continues a conversation about what spatial concepts are being used and how.

Date: 14-06-2018
Time: 15:00 - 16:30

This event is a continuation of the previous Speculative lunch 'Spatial Connections' that took place in March 2018

Abstract

Space appears across the arts and humanities. In improving page layout, critiquing choreography, analyzing film, theorizing narratives of migration, blending sounds together, or understanding the role of walking in arts practice, we encounter spatial relations. Various disciplines have recognized a ‘spatial turn’, sometimes a ‘topological turn’, revealing new ways of understanding cultures. Space provides both a theoretical lens and ways to discuss the construction of objects and events. Narratives and journeys unfold in space. Language situates participants and objects in space. Words and images occupy space, depend on it, manipulate it. In the digital humanities, in virtual worlds and in social media, physical space and computational spaces are intertwined.

Thinking beyond the boundaries of individual disciplines, we would like to start a conversation about what spatial concepts are being used and how. What can we learn from different ways of handling space? What is common across disciplines? Are there models we can share? Are there useful ways of thinking about space that are currently used in some disciplines but have unexplored potential for others? How does space in the digital world interact with other spatialities in the arts and humanities?

Convenors

Eirini Boukla (School of Design); Scott McLaughlin (School of Music); Nicolas Salazar Sutil (School of Performance and Cultural Industries); John Stell (School of Computing); and Martin Thomas (School of Languages, Cultures and Societies)

Refreshments will be provided, so if you wish to attend this event please email lhri@leeds.ac.uk

Location: Seminar Room 2, LHRI (Leeds Humanities Research Institute)
Cost: Free