Dr Jamie  Dow

Dr Jamie Dow

Lecturer, Director of Research - IDEA

+44 (0)113 343 7887

Summary: Jamie's research interests lie in Ancient Philosophy (particularly Aristotle), the Emotions and Ethics. He is involved in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, and the supervision of research.

Location: IDEA Research Centre

Overview

Jamie is the Discovery Theme Leader for Ethics, Religion and Law. He is also involved in organising the IDEA centre's Applied Ethics research seminar.

His research is mainly in Ancient Philosophy, but also extends into related areas in Applied Ethics. His undergraduate teaching is mainly in Business, Computing, Media and Environmental Ethics. At postgraduate level, he is involved in PhD supervision, and he teaches on the Centre's MA in Biomedical and Health Care Ethics (online and campus) and online MA in Applied and Professional Ethics (online), and on Masters programmes in the Business School.

Jamie is principal investigator of the 'Leading Minds' research project in Ancient Philosophy and Contemporary Leadership, based at the IDEA Centre. www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/leadingminds

Prior to coming to Leeds, he was studying for his doctorate ("The role of Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's Rhetoric", 2008) at the University of St Andrews, following an MPhil in Philosophy at King's College London. Before that, he worked in business, in production and purchasing management with Courtaulds Textiles, and then as a management consultant with Pricewaterhouse Coopers. Before that, he completed his undergraduate degree in Classics at Balliol College, Oxford.

Selected publications

  • Passions and Persuasion in Aristotle's Rhetoric, Oxford Aristotle Studies Series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
  • "Proof-reading Aristotle's Rhetoric", Archiv Geschichte der Philosophie, 96.1 (2014), 1-37.
  • "Feeling Fantastic Again - Passions, Appearances and Beliefs in Aristotle", Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, vol. XLVI (summer 2014).
  • "Ethics of Advertising", in LaFollette, Hugh (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics, (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming 2012).
  • "Feeling Fantastic "& "Emotions and Appearances in Aristotle", Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, vol. XXXVII (2010).
  • "Aristotle's Theory of the Emotions", in Pakaluk, M and Pearson, G (eds.) Moral Psychology and Human Action in Aristotle, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2010).
  • "A supposed contradiction about emotion-arousal in Aristotle's Rhetoric", Phronesis 52.4 (2007), 382-402.