Alessio Mattana

Alessio Mattana

Postgraduate Researcher

Summary: My research area is the long eighteenth century, particularly the relation between literature and science in Great Britain and the interconnections between Italian and British writers and translators.

Teaching Commitments: 2016/17: Seminar teaching on the 'Writing Critically' module convened by Dr Jeremy Davies.

Research

My research activity mainly focuses on English literature in the long eighteenth century.

At present, I am working on the relationship between literature and science in eighteenth-century England. In particular, I am investigating the cultural influence of the concept of 'evidence' developed by Isaac Newton in his philosophical and mathematical works on genres as diverse as the early novel, the historiographical account and the it-narrative.

I have also an interest in exploring the interconnections between English and Italian writers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, particularly with respect to the translations of literary works and the imagery of Italian landscapes. 

Academic activities

Organiser with Laura Lucia Rossi of CompLab@Leeds, an award-winning research group sponsored by the Leverhulme project directed by Prof. Stuart Taberner and by the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies.

Chair with PGR Sam Burton of the Postgraduate Seminar 16/17 at the School of English.

Journal articles

'Robinson Crusoe tra reason e fancy', Il confronto letterario (no 62, Summer 2014), 28 pp.

Contributions in edited volumes

'"From One Faculty to Another": Text and Image in Robert Hooke’s Micrographia', Parola e immagine nell’opera d’arte e letteraria, ed. by Carmen Concilio, forthcoming.

'The Chinese Spy. Duplicity and Dissimulation in Goldsmith's Chinese Letters, Plots and Plotters. Double Agents and Villains in Spy Fictions, ed. by Carmen Concilio (Milano: Mimesis International, 2016), 15 pp.

A Symphony of Light and Colour”: John Addington Symonds and the Use of Colour in Venice', Immagini dell’Italia di viaggiatori inglesi dal 1861 ad’oggi, ed. by Paolo Bertinetti (Torino: Trauben, 2014), 12 pp.