Caitlin E. Stobie

Caitlin E. Stobie

PhD Candidate

Summary: Posthumanism, new materialism; postcolonial ecocriticism; postcolonial literature; critical animal studies; literature and biology.

Overview

My thesis examines representations of abortion, embodiment, and agency in southern African fiction written during the late twentieth century. I am supervised by Prof. Graham Huggan

My research is funded by the Bonamy Dobrée Research Scholarship and the Oppenheimer Memorial Trust. I have previously held awards from the Andrew Mellon Foundation (BA Hons) and the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission (MA).

Activities:
 I am an intern on the AHRC Research Project 'The Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective', a collaboration between the Thackray Medical Museum and Leeds University's Centre for History and Philosophy of Science. Additionally, I am co-director of the Leeds Animal Studies Network

Conferences: I have presented papers at seminar series, conferences and workshops including: the NNMHR Congress at Durham University (2017); Empathies (11th SLSAeu Conference) at the University of Basel (2017); Performing the Urban: Embodiments, Inventories, Rhythms (16th triennial EACLALS conference) at the University of Oviedo (2017); Finding Africa at the University of Leeds (2017); The Future of Wild Europe at the University of Leeds (2016); Figuring Animals - Images and Imaginaries in Anglophone Literary and Media Texts at Mid-Sweden University (2016); Writing the South African City at London School of Economics (2016); Literature's Animals at the University of Bristol (2016), and the South African Literature and Ecology Colloquium at Rhodes University (2013).

I recently organised Animals and Borders -- the second meeting of the Northern Animals research collective -- which was generously co-sponsored by the British Society for Literature and Science (BSLS), the University of Leeds's Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies (ICPS), and International Writers at Leeds (IWAL). This public engagement event follows the University of Sheffield's inaugural Northern Animals meeting that was funded by the White Rose College of the Humanities and Arts (WRoCAH) in 2017, and at which I was an invited speaker and co-organiser. In 2016 I co-organised Bridging the Divide: Literature and Science in Canterbury, UK with other postgraduates from the Universities of Kent and Sussex. The conference was funded by a grant from the Consortium for the Humanities and Arts South-east England (CHASE), AHRC.