Dr Ian Caldwell

Associate Professor of Southeast Asian Studies

Summary: The history of South Sulawesi, Indonesia, before 1900; the history and culture of Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia

About Dr Ian Caldwell

Ian Caldwell has worked in, and studied, Southeast Asia since 1973. His main research interest is the early history of South Sulawesi, Indonesia, but he has has published in disciplines including biography, philology and archaeology. He holds a BA in Indonesian and Malaysian Studies from London University, a PhD in Southeast Asian History from the Australian National University, and an advanced diploma in Indonesian language and culture from Universitas Satyawacana. He has taught at the National University of Singapore, the University of Hull, and the University of Naples. He is the co-ordinator for the Origin of Complex Society in South Sulawesi (OXIS) research group.

Recent Activities

  • Fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and the Caribbean, November 2014.
  • Presented lectures on Islam in Southeast Asia at the University of Cologne, June 2014.
  • Presented a 4-credit module on the archaeology and early history of Southeast Asia at the University of Naples, May 2014.
  • Panel organiser and participant at the panel 'Drivers of State Formation in Sulawesi, Indonesia', at the Third Southeast Asian Studies Symposium at Keeble College, The University of Oxford, March 2014.
  • Participant at the IIAS Patterns of Early Asian Urbanism Conference, Leiden, The Netherlands, November 2013.
  • Participant at the 5th Prague Conference of Southeast Asian Studies, Prague, November 2013.
  • Participant at the RESAREAS Seminar on Southeast Asia from the Perspective of Humanities, Metropolitan University Prague, November 2013.
  • Participant at the Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde workshop on state formation, Leiden, July 2013.
  • Participant at the 7th EUROSEAS Conference in Lisbon, July 2013.
  • Participant at the Southeast Asian Studies Symposium, Oxford, March 2013.

Honorary Posts

  • Visiting lecturer in Southeast Asian History at the University of Naples.
  • Visiting lecturer in the Department of Oriental Studies, the University of Cologne.
  • Member of the International Advisory Board of Indonesia and the Malay World.

Key Publications and Activities

Books and Monographs

  • (2014) With Nurhady Simorok. Munculnya negeri petani. Makassar: Ininawa. In press.
  • (2008) with David Henley (eds) Indonesia and the Malay World Special Issue on Stranger-Kings 37.
  • (2006) with Eric Oey (eds and author) Sumatra. Berkeley: Periplus.
  • (2000) with David Bulbeck, Land of Iron. The historical archeology of Luwu and the Cenrana valley. Results of the Origins of Complex Society in South Sulawesi Project (OXIS). Centre for South-East Asian Studies Occasional Publications Series, University of Hull.
  • (1990) with Toby Volkman (eds and author) Sulawesi. The Celebes, Berkeley: Periplus.
  • (1989) with David Bulbeck, Survey pusat kerajaan Soppeng 1100-1987. Canberra: Meyer Foundation.

Journal Articles and Papers

  • (2014) with David Bulbeck. The indigenous fortifications of South Sulawesi, Indonesia, and their socio-political foundations. Terra Australis. In press.
  • (2014) A journey through the central highlands of South Sulawesi. Review of Indonesian and Malay Affairs. In Press.
  • (2008) with David Henley, Stranger kings in Indonesia and beyond. Magic, logic, polemic. Indonesia and the Malay World 36(105):163-75
  • (2008) with David Henley, Kings and covenants. Stranger-kings and social contract in Sulawesi. Indonesia and the Malay World 37(105):269-91
  • (2008) with David Bulbeck,  Oryza Satvia and the origins of kingdoms in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Evidence from rice husk phytoliths. Indonesia and the Malay World 36(104): 1-20.
  • (2006) Three locally-made bronzes from South Sulawesi. Possible evidence of cultural transfer from Java about AD 1000? Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs 39(1): 17-27.
  • (2005 ) Kronologi raja-raja Luwu hingga awal ke-17. In: Robinson, K. and Mukhlis (eds) Tapak-tapak sejarah; Kebudayaan, sejarah dan hidup sosial di Sulawesi Selatan. Makassar: Ininawa: 53-73.
  • (2004) with Wayne Bougas, The early history of Binamu and Bangkala, South Sulawesi. Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- and Volkenkunde 164(4): 456-510.
  • (2004) with Malcolm Lillie, Manuel Pinto's inland sea. Using palaeo-environmental techniques to assess historical data from South Sulawesi. Modern Quaternary Studies in Southeast Asia 18: 259-72.
  • (2001) with C.C. Macknight, Variation in Bugis manuscripts. Archipel 61: 139-154.
  • (1997) A rock carving and a newly-discovered stone burial chamber at Pasemah, Sumatra. Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde 153: 169-181.
  • (1995) Power, state and society among the pre-Islamic Bugis. Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde 151: 394-421.
  • (1994) with A. Hazelwood, 'The holy footprints of the venerable Gautama'. A new translation of the Pasir Panjang inscription. Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde:150: 457-480.
  • (1991) The myth of the exemplary centre. Shelly Errington's Meaning and power in a Southeast Asian realm. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 22: 109-118.
  • (1985) Anak Agung Panji Tisna. Balinese raja and Indonesian novelist, 1908-1978. Indonesia Circle 36: 55-79.

Book Chapters

  • (2008) Form criticism and its applicability to Bugis historical texts. In: Y. Lander and A. Ogloblin (eds), Language and text in the Austronesian world. Studies in honor of Ülo Sirk. Berlin: Lincom Europe, pp. 299-326.
  • (2004) Kenyataan, anakronisme dan fiksi. Arkeologi bersejarah dan pusat-pusat kerajaan La Galigo. In: Nurhayati Rahman et al. (eds), La Galigo. Menyelusuri warisan sastera dunia. Makassar: Pusat Kegiatan Penelitian Universitas Hasanuddin (2004), pp. 459-66.
  • (1998) The Chronology of the King List of Luwuq to A.D.1611. In: Robinson, K. and Mukhlis (eds), Living through histories. Culture, history and social life in South Sulawesi. Canberra: Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the Australian National University and Indonesian National Archives, pp. 29-42.

Associated Websites [External Pages]

Funded Research Projects

  • 2008 Association of Southeast Asian Studies in the United Kingdom, The history and archaeology of Mandar, Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia, £4,635.
  • 2004 British Academy, Committee for South-East Asian Studies, Land of Iron publication project, £4,000.
  • 2002 Arts and Humanities Research Board, Research Leave Scheme, The history of the Bugis speaking regions of South Sulwesi, Indonesia, AD 1300-1600, £12,035.
  • 2001 British Academy, Committee for South-East Asian Studies, The political geography of Bantaeng, Sinjai, Southern Luwu and Mengkoka, £4,500.
  • 2000 ANU Faculties Research Grants, Human and environmental history of the Tempe lowlands, A$19,869.
  • 1999 UK-Dutch Joint Scientific Research Programme, Textual sources for the kingdom of Cina, £1,180.
  • 1999 British Academy, Visiting Fellowship, Drs Iwan Sumantri, Lecturer in Archaeology, Universitas Hasanuddin, £2,000.
  • 1998 British Academy, Committee for Southeast Asian Studies, The archaeology of the Cenrana Valley, £5,576.
  • 1997 British Academy, Committee for Southeast Asian Studies, The political geography of South Sulawesi, £2,940.
  • 1997 The University of Hull Research Fund, The origin of complex society in South Sulawesi, £4,500.
  • 1997 Australian Research Council Large Grant, The origin of complex society in South Sulawesi, A$95,000.
  • 1995  British Academy, Committee for South-East Asian Studies Bugis Literature Project: The Tragedy of La Padoma,  £3,500

Teaching

Undergraduate

  • EAST1600 The Making of the Asia Pacific to 1945
  • EAST1602 The Asia Pacific since 1945
  • EAST1705 The Foundations of Southeast Asia
  • EAST1708 The History of Southeast Asia
  • EAST3500 Long Research Dissertation
  • EAST3706 The Making of Modern Southeast Asia

Postgraduate

  • EAST5036M The Making of Modern Southeast Asia

PhD Supervision

Ian Caldwell has supervised a number of PhD topics on the history South Sulawesi and other areas of the Indo-Malaysian archipelago. Two of his students have had their thesis accepted for publication in the Verhandelingen series of the Royal Netherlands Institute for Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies. He is currently supervising PhDs on the structural geometry of Malay illuminated manuscripts, and Western Austronesian oral traditions analysed from a Literary Darwinist perspective.