Events and Excursions

The IMC will once again include a lively programme of events and excursions. Please click on the events below for further details. All events and excursions are open to IMC delegates and the general public. Delegates may book tickets in advance when registering for the IMC 2017. Please click here to view the terms and conditions.

All IMC events and excursions are open to members of the public unless otherwise stated.

The Leeds University Union Medieval Society is hosting a range of medieval-themed events during the IMC in Leeds University Union, including the inaugural International Medieval Film Festival. For more details about the Society, their Events Programme and the Film Festival, view the Leeds University Union Medieval Society Programme of Events or visit the LUU Medieval Society webpage.

View a map of the Congress site

IMC 2017 News and Updates

For the latest news, updates, and photos from IMC 2017 events, we have launched a new mobile-responsive website.

Visit our IMC 2017 microsite

Sunday 02 July 2017

Excursion: Canons Regular in Yorkshire: Kirkham, Old Malton, and Bridlington Priories

£45.00

Medieval Day at the Museum

FREE

Excursion: Ripon Minster

£26.00

'Direct Mine Arms': A Combat Workshop

£15.00

'Write Till Your Ink Be Dry': A Calligraphy Workshop

£24.50

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Traditional Music Session

FREE

International Medieval Film Festival: El Nasser Salah Ad-Din (1963)

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Monday 03 July 2017

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Keynote Lectures: The Mediterranean Other and the Other Mediterranean: Perspective of Alterity in the Middle Ages / Drawing Boundaries: Inclusion and Exclusion in Medieval Islamic Societies

FREE

Keynote Lecture: The Other Part of the World for Late Medieval Latin Christendom

FREE

Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: Medieval Manuscripts

FREE

Excursion: Helmsley Castle

£26.50

Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Gardens and Gardening in Early Medieval Spain and Portugal

FREE

'Tho Turned I Myn Astrolabye': A Hands-On Introduction to the Astrolabe

FREE

The Franks in the East: Music for a Medieval Prince

£14.00

Leeds University Union Pub Quiz

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Tuesday 04 July 2017

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Keynote Lecture: Other Sexualities - The 'Natural' and the 'Unnatural' in Medieval French Ovidian Narratives

FREE

Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: The Incunabula Collection

FREE

Excursion: The Royal Armouries Museum

£16.00

International Medieval Film Festival: The Seventh Seal

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

The Tale of Jaufre

FREE

Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: Outside Noah's Ark: Sympathy and Survival as the Waters Rise

FREE

'A Ring Wound Round with Silver': A Jewellery Workshop

£28.50

Otherness in the World of the Troubadours

£12.00

Wednesday 05 July 2017

Medieval Craft Fair

FREE

Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: Ripon Cathedral Library and Archives

FREE

Excursion: Stonyhurst College: The Stonyhurst Collections

£24.00

Second Shepherds' Play: An Adaptation of the Townley Second Shepherds' Pageant for Film

FREE

The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Public Medievalism: A Round Table Discussion

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Open Mic Night

FREE

Thursday 06 July 2017

Excursion: Lincoln Cathedral and the Bishops' Palace

£45.00

Making Leeds Medieval

FREE

Historical & Archaeological Societies Fair

FREE

Excursion: Gawain Country

£40.00

Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: The Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society

FREE

Historical Fiction Masterclass

£10.00

Excursion: Knaresborough Castle

£32.00

International Medieval Film Festival: Alexander: Warrior Saint

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Friday 07 July 2017

How Medievalists Can Engage a Wider Audience: A Workshop

£7.50

Central Government, Courts, Commemoration, and the Church: Medieval Records and The National Archives: A Workshop

£7.50

Fragments and Bindings from Ripon Cathedral: A Workshop

£7.50

Canons Regular in Yorkshire: Kirkham, Old Malton, and Bridlington Priories

Sunday 02 July

Price: £45.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Though perhaps overshadowed by the Cistercians, the canons predate them, and Yorkshire had some of the most important canons’ houses in England. The canons regular were not monks, but priests, living a communal life. They followed a simpler rule based on the writings of St Augustine of Hippo and often served churches appropriated to the monastery. Despite their different status, their monasteries included very similar buildings to those of the Benedictine and Cistercian monks.

The tour will look at three examples of priories used by canons: the Augustinian priories of Kirkham and Bridlington and the Gilbertine priory of Old Malton. Parts of the churches of Bridlington and Old Malton remain in use as parish churches; Kirkham was one of the earliest monastic ruins to be taken into state care. All three have benefitted from recent and on-going research.

Kirkham Priory was established by Walter Espec, lord of Helmsley, in about 1122, and is significant for the excavation of its early unaisled church. In 1139, the house nearly transferred to the Cistercians, resulting in a valuable record of the state of its buildings and estate in that year. But the transfer never happened, and in the 13th-century Kirkham was adopted as a mausoleum by the de Roos lords of Helmsley. This occasioned a significant rebuilding project that halted abruptly when they later transferred their loyalty to Rievaulx Abbey. Virtually all of the monastic plan is visible together with the great gatehouse, which displays the arms of prominent patrons of the priory.

Old Malton Priory was established by Eustace fitz John in 1150 in parallel with his and his wife’s foundation of their Gilbertine double house of Watton in Holderness, the first monastery established for Gilbertine canons alone, as a rest-home for canons exhausted by their spiritual ministrations to the nuns of the order. What survives today is a large part of the nave, shorn of its aisles, and the west front with a large south-west tower, originally one of a pair.

Bridlington Priory was one of the first Augustinian houses established in the north of England in 1113. What survives today is the very large 13th-century nave and impressive twin western towers of a substantial rebuilding, which remained parochial to the suppression. The remainder of the church, its cloister and inner and outer courts can be reconstructed from a detailed survey of its buildings made in 1537, though only a single monastic building has survived: the great gate to the inner court. Inside the church, parts of the very fine and elaborate 12th-century cloister arcade have been re-erected.

Additionally, we will have the opportunity to view the late Norman manor house, an impressive chamber block at Burton Agnes, built by an early patron of Bridlington Priory. The guides for this excursion are Glyn Coppack, Archaeological and Historical Research, and Stuart Harrison, Ryedale Archaeological Services and Cathedral Archaeologist at York. A packed lunch will be included.

For more information on the sites, please visit:

www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/kirkham-priory

www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/burton-agnes-manor-house

www.bridlingtonpriory.co.uk

www.stmarysmalton.org.uk

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Medieval Day at the Museum

Sunday 02 July

Price: Free

Leeds City Museum: Broderick Room

12.00 - 15.00

Join us at the Broderick Room, 12.00-15.00, in the Leeds City Museum to experience Medieval Day at the Museum, where you will have the chance to immerse yourself in medieval-inspired activities, demonstrations, and performances for all ages from the Royal Armouries Museum, the Stamford Bridge Tapestry Project, the Leeds Waits and more.

Visitors will also have a chance to view the display of the West Yorkshire Hoard, now on permanent display at the Leeds City Museum, alongside Anglo-Saxon cross fragments from Leeds Parish Church and finds from Kirkstall Abbey.

Leeds City Museum, originally established in 1819, reopened in September 2008 in the stunning Leeds Institute Building built by Cuthbert Broderick in 1865-68. The collections ranging from ancient finds to natural history are housed in six galleries. Highlights from the collections include the Leeds Tiger, Nesyammun the mummy, and the West Yorkshire Hoard.

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Ripon Minster

Sunday 02 July

Price: £26.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 18.00

Ripon Minster, a cathedral only since 1836, was originally one of the four minsters of the York diocese (the others are York, Beverley, and Southwell). An early monastery was founded by St Wilfrid in 672, and the crypt still remains from this building. Here it is possible to get a sense of how the early Christians experienced a pilgrimage to the relics of saints, moving through the dark and disorientating passageways underground until the shrine was reached and spiritual benefit achieved. The church itself is now a Gothic building of several periods from the 12th-16th centuries, with the early work of major importance to the development of Gothic architecture in England. On this excursion it will be possible to discover the history of the building, examine its medieval furnishings, including a very fine set of carved misericords, and get a glimpse back into the Anglo-Saxon past by visiting the crypt.

This excursion will also explore Ripon’s Norman chapel, the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalen, founded by the Archbishop of York in the 12th century in service of a hospital caring for lepers and blind priests. It survived the English Reformation and retains many of its historical features such as the original stone altar, Roman floor, and 15th-century oak screen. New research has revealed a great deal more about the building, as we will discover on site.

This excursion will be led by Jenny Alexander, Department of Art History, University of Warwick.

For more information on Ripon Cathedral, please visit riponcathedral.info. The webpage of the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalen is found on www.stmarymagsripon.org.uk.

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'Direct Mine Arms: A Combat Workshop

Sunday 02 July

Price: £15.00

Directed by: Dean Davidson and Stuart Ivinson, Kunst des Fechtens (KDF) International

Refectory

14.00 - 16.30.

Have you ever had a desire to learn how to fight like our historical forbears or study the highly effective fighting style that was taught throughout the medieval period? If so, why not join us for a workshop in the use of medieval arming swords, brought to you in conjunction with Kunst des Fechtens (KDF) International.

KDF workshops bring a dynamic approach to training, with a martial application of this historical art, through practical drills combined with interpretations from historical treatises. Our professional and experienced instructors will be on hand to provide tuition in this noble fighting style.

KDF International is an association of like-minded clubs whose aim is to promote the study, development, and practice of the martial arts tradition of medieval and Renaissance Germany, in particular those of the Master Johannes Liechtenauer. These martial arts have been preserved in numerous treatises and have been unearthed, transcribed, translated and interpreted into a modern understanding of a subtle, dynamic, and effective martial arts system that looks at the use of a number of weapons of the time as well as wrestling. Founded in 2006, KDF was born from a desire to focus attention on Liechtenauer's works as well as bringing a dynamic approach to training, adding the use of protection as well as free-play exercises and bouts to drill and practice as a part of trying to triangulate a truth within their interpretations.

Dean Davidson has over 20 years’ experience in martial arts and training in historical weapons. He is the KDF International Senior Instructor and European Historical Combat Guild Chapter Master at the Royal Armouries, Leeds. He is an active member of Combat Archaeology, an international organisation committed to the promulgation of systematic and developed knowledge of the nature of combat and combat in the past. Dean is passionate about sharing knowledge on this subject and regularly presents at renowned international conferences and seminars, providing a unique insight into the arms and armour used throughout medieval warfare. He is also a founding member of the Towton Battlefield Frei Compagnie and the Creative Director of 3 Swords, a prestigious medieval historical and armed combat interpretation group, presentations of which include museum-quality displays of arms and armour for organisations such as the National Archives at Kew, English Heritage and numerous British museums. Dean holds a Masters in Health Informatics from the University of Leeds and is a member of the Leeds University Medieval Society. He frequently runs workshops in historical European martial arts from an array of academic sources throughout the UK.

Stuart Ivinson has been involved with historical combat for 16 years, joining the European Historical Combat Guild in 2000 and KDF upon its inception in 2006. He is currently an assistant teacher at the Leeds Chapter of both organisations. Stuart is also a member of the Towton Battlefield Society Frei Compagnie, and a founder member of 3 Swords. Stuart has an MA in Librarianship, an MA in Medieval History and a P.Dip in Heritage Management. When he is not being Dean’s sidekick he is the Librarian at the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds.

All weapons are provided by KDF and attendees are asked to arrive wearing indoor training shoes and appropriate and comfortable gym training gear that will allow freedom of movement (i.e. t-shirt and track suit bottoms). Please make the instructors aware of any prior medical conditions.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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'Write Till Your Ink Be Dry': A Calligraphy Workshop

Sunday 02 July

Price: £24.50

Directed by: Sara Mack

Leeds University Union: Room 6 - Roundhay

13.30 - 18.30

Calligraphy literally means ‘beautiful writing’, but forms of writing now perceived as being simply ornamental were once highly functional for the transcription of texts. Western calligraphy is recognizable by the use of the Roman alphabet, which first appeared in 600 BC. In the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, the Uncial style of lettering developed and was used in monasteries for copying the Bible and other religious texts. After several centuries, Carolingian script developed in the Holy Roman Empire under the patronage of Charlemagne. Although clearly legible, this script was time-consuming to produce, resulting in the development of Gothic, which could be produced more quickly, in the 12th century. Gothic script continued to be used throughout the later Middle Ages and was adopted by Johannes Gutenberg in the production of his printed Bible.

The workshop is aimed at beginners with little or no experience of calligraphy, but more experienced calligraphers are also welcome. Specific importance will be placed upon how to hold the pen and how the various angles of the nib influence the stroke of each letter. Participants will be taught a basic Roman skeleton style of forming letters, which will show the way to produce precise variation in the thickness of strokes. There will also be an introduction to Gothic, or Black Letter, script (famously used in late medieval works such as the Luttrell Psalter), which will illustrate how to vary the size of letters and produce consistent letter forms. Participants will also create a greeting card of their own design.

Sara Mack is a calligrapher from Leeds with over 20 years’ teaching experience. She has produced work for various institutions such as St Gemma’s Hospice and the National Trust, as well as many local businesses. She also served as the calligrapher for the ‘Chronicles of Froissart’ exhibition held at the Royal Armouries in Leeds in 2008. In 2011, the work of both Sara and her students was featured in the ‘Art of Calligraphy’ exhibition at Lotherton Hall. More recently, her work was seen in the BBC productions of ‘Death Comes to Pemberley’ (2013) and ‘To Walk Invisible’ (2016).

The workshop fee includes the necessary materials (pen, nib, ink, and paper), but participants are asked to bring a soft pencil and a 30 cm ruler.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Traditional Music Session

Sunday 02 July

Price: Free

University Square: The Marquee

19.30 - 22.00

Several musicians will be playing and singing folk music from (broadly speaking) the Scottish/ Irish/ English/ American traditions on fiddle, pipes, whistle, guitar, and other instruments (playing tunes mostly in D, G, and A concert pitch). Anyone who wants to bring their instrument (including voice) is welcome to come along and join in (sorry, no crumhorns!). Details of some sets of tunes will be circulated before the event. For further details contact Alan Murray a.v.murray@leeds.ac.uk.

This event is not a concert, but an informal opportunity to meet and play music with other delegates. We invite you to get a drink and play, sing, or just listen!

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Keynote Lectures: The Mediterranean Other and the Other Mediterranean: Perspective of Alterity in the Middle Ages / Drawing Boundaries: Inclusion and Exclusion in Medieval Islamic Societies

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Great Hall

9.00 - 10.30

Speaker: Nikolas Jaspert, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and Eduardo Manzano Moreno, Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid

Introduction: Hans-Werner Goetz, Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg

The Mediterranean Other and the Other Mediterranean: Perspective of Alterity in the Middle Ages:

For many decades, the medieval Mediterranean has repeatedly been put to use in order to address, understand, or explain current issues. Lately, it tends to be seen either as an epitome of transcultural entanglements or - quite on the contrary - as an area of endemic religious conflict. In this paper, I would like to reflect on such readings of the Mediterranean and relate them to several approaches within a dynamic field of historical research referred to as 'xenology'. I will therefore discuss different modalities of constructing self and otherness in the central and western Mediterranean during the High and Late Middle Ages. The multiple forms of interaction between politically dominant and subaltern religious communities or the conceptual challenges posed by trans-Mediterranean mobility are but two of the vibrant arenas in which alterity was necessarily both negotiated and formed during the medieval millennium. Otherness is however not reduced to the sphere of social and thus human relations. I will therefore also reflect on medieval societies' dealings with the Mediterranean Sea as a physical and oftentimes alien space.

Drawing Boundaries: Inclusion and Exclusion in Medieval Islamic Societies:

The Arab expansion of the 7th and 8th centuries created a new political and social community that was defined by certain elements, both ideological and cultural, that were partaken by all its members. Shared religion and language played a prominent role, but crucially some of these elements were also visible, as shown by recently uncovered evidence from seals, cemeteries, or early archaeological sites. Yet by defining itself, medieval Islam also defined ‘the others’, those who simply did not share in these identifying features. However, these features were also social and cultural, which tended to blur the lines between Muslims and non-Muslim communities living within recently-conquered territories. Recent research demonstrates that, although the conquests were an important milestone in the creation of this new community, its formation was far from complete. Close contact with the conquered populations helped to shape the traits of the community, which refused to be assimilated into pre-existing ideological or cultural frameworks. Thus, otherness in medieval Islamic societies reveals itself to be more nuanced concept than is usually perceived: rigid and uncompromising when it helps to draw distinctions in order to prevent any form of assimilation; flexible and adaptable when it fosters processes of social integration.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Keynote Lecture: The Other Part of the World for Late Medieval Latin Christendom

Monday 03 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber

13.00 - 14.00

Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen

Introduction: Hans-Werner Goetz, Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg

The final goal of history for medieval Christians was a completely Christian world and Christians had the moral obligation to actively achieve this goal. Consequently, the basic structure of the Latin Christian world view was dichotomic: Christians and non-Christians, we and all sorts of other peoples, Latin Christian homeland and the rest of the earth. During the history of the high and later Middle Ages, the world grew bigger from the point of view of the Latin Christians and the reaching of the goal grew more distant. The experiences connected to this development and the actions demanded by it made constant re-calibrations necessary of who and what the other was, how the other could be defined, explained, and dealt with, in what way the other could relate to the 'we', and finally, what the 'we' was. While this is an interesting and multifaceted process in itself, it is also deeply related to present questions of identity in Europe, to the very essence of the question how 'Europe' could be defined and who 'the other' is as opposed to present day Europeans. Both aspects can hardly be separated by historians who work consciously of their own cultural dependency, and both aspects will consequently be addressed in the lecture.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: Medieval Manuscripts

Monday 03 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

12.00 - 14.00

Join us for a drop-in session to see medieval treasures from Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Special Collections staff will be in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery with a selection of highlights from the collections for delegates to examine close-up.

The Brotherton Collection contains finely illuminated 15th-century French and Flemish books of hours, psalters and prayer books. There are also German chained manuscripts from the 1450s and Middle English manuscripts. In addition, the Brotherton Collection boasts a manuscript Universal Chronicle which takes the form of a roll nearly 18 metres long. This manuscript is currently on display in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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Helmsley Castle

Monday 03 July

Price: £26.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Helmsley Castle's occupation spans from the 12th century to the 17th century. The castle was first built by Walter l'Espec and was the residence of the de Roos family until the early Tudor period. The site, including its landscape, is an excellent example of continual use of a fortified site over several centuries, and the architecture reflects the changing needs and desires of the lord and his family. The excursion will explore the 12th-century ringworks, the 12th- to 14th-century stone structure, and the 16th-century lodgings in order to tell the story of defence, hospitality, and lordship. The tour will touch on the castle’s defensive features, but will focus on the site as a residence and a centre of power for a wealthy northern family whose renovation of the castle in the 16th century reflected the ambitions and desires of an up-and-coming Tudor gentleman, Edward of Etal. The surviving plasterwork, fireplace, and heraldry all boast of a family visually displaying their authority through architecture. The 16th-century renovations situated next to the 12th-century tower are visual reminders for the 21st-century observer of the importance of architecture and the power it conveyed.

Dr Audrey Thorstad of the School of History, Welsh History & Archaeology, Bangor University, will lead the excursion.

The excursion will explore not only the surviving building work but also the landscape surrounding the castle. Therefore, this excursion requires footwear suitable for walking and clothing for all weather conditions.

For more information on Helmsley Castle, please visit www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/helmsley-castle

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Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Gardens and Gardening in Early Medieval Spain and Portugal

Monday 03 July

Price: Free

Great Hall

19.00 - 20.00

Sponsor: Early Medieval Europe

Wendy Davies, formerly University College London

Introduction: Marios Costambeys, Department of History, University of Liverpool

Although we may have an image of flowers and perfumes adorning the palaces of Andalusi Spain, gardens do not come so quickly to mind when we think about the North in the early Middle Ages. Yet northern Iberian charters often detail transactions in gardens - differentiated from arable land - and recent macro-botanical work throws some light on what was cultivated.

The Iberian peninsula is a large landmass and it has a wide diversity of landscapes, from mountains and high plateaux to coastal lowlands and rolling forests. There is also great climatic diversity: the South has a much higher mean temperature than the centre or North, and there is great variation in rainfall, from the wet North West to the dry South East. In the early Middle Ages there was cultural diversity too: invasion of the Visigothic state by Muslim groups in the early 8th century brought Berbers and Arabs. Muslim rule was in the long run challenged by the Christian kingdoms of the North, but throughout the ups and downs of political change people occupied the landscape and worked the land. All of this makes it particularly interesting to investigate how far this land's inhabitants managed the physical space around their homes and how far they supplemented staple foods with more personal produce.

There are many things to explore: when archaeologists designate areas of excavated settlements as gardens, what kinds of garden do they have in mind - decorative, or productive, or just somewhere to store tools? Is it reasonable to classify such spaces as 'gardens' at all? When 9th- and 10th-century northern texts specify gardens, do they differentiate garden from orchard and from vineyard? And, given the number of fruit trees named, did the redactors recognize any difference between garden and orchard? Although Arabic texts describe wonderful gardens in the South, how many of these texts include descriptions borrowed from writing elsewhere in the Arabic world? And, in the end, for North and South, what was grown? Were gardens significant contributors to domestic food production?

The journal Early Medieval Europe is pleased to sponsor its annual lecture at the International Medieval Congress in order to highlight the importance of the Congress to scholars working in early medieval European history and to support further research in this field. Early Medieval Europe is an interdisciplinary journal that covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, the British Isles, Scandinavia, and continental Europe. Further information about the journal and details on how to submit material to it are available at http://eu.wiley.com. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the editorial board after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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'Tho Turned I Myn Astrolabye': A Hands-On Introduction to the Astrolabe

Monday 03 July

Ticket Price: Free

Performed by: Kristine Larsen

University House: De Grey Room

19.00-20.30

Most medieval scholars have heard of the astrolabe, part work of art and part personal computer. For centuries the instrument was used across both the Christian and Islamic worlds in order to calculate times of prayer, measure the height of the sun and stars above the horizon for navigation, and aid in surveying. It is a two-dimensional model of the three-dimensional heavens that you can hold in your hands.

Anyone who has ever tried to work their way through Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe without a basic astronomical knowledge might have (understandably) given up after the first few steps, but the astrolabe is actually not a daunting device if you just have some basic background. This hands-on workshop is an introduction to the history and science of the astrolabe, including step-by-step instructions on how to do some of the most elementary computations with the instrument (including calculating the times of sunrise, sunset, and morning and evening twilight; estimating the height of the sun at local noon; and finding one’s latitude).

The workshop is presented by Central Connecticut State University astronomy professor Kristine Larsen, who has made similar presentations at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo for several years, as well as numerous other universities and educational centers. The first 50 attendees will receive a free cardboard astrolabe set for the latitude of Leeds as well as an instruction sheet (both theirs to keep).

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The Franks in the East: Music for a Medieval Prince

Monday 03 July

Price: £14.00

Performed By: Trouvère

Leeds Universities Catholic Chaplaincy

20.30 - 22.00

The Chansonnier du Roi (Bibliothèque Nationale de France fr. 844) is a major source for the music of the troubadours and trouvères, and also contains the earliest extant European dance music.

The Chansonnier was produced by or for Guillaume II de Villehardouin, the French prince of the Morea in southern Greece in the middle years. It is a premier expression of the courtly chivalric image that such princely courts liked to promote for themselves, but it is also the product and self-expression of an alien culture implanted onto the Byzantine East. Additionally, this chansonnier is one of the principal sources for troubadour music – but troubadour music intended for a French-speaking audience. As such, the original language of the troubadour songs is reworked in this source into a ‘Frenchified’ lyric language (as op

posed to Occitan) which is yet another expression of exotic otherness.

‘The Franks in the East’ features music exclusively from the Chansonnier du Roi to tell the story of the Villehardouins and their glittering Greek principality.

As a group, Trouvère combine thorough historical research with musical experience and understanding, focusing in particular on the music of the High Middle Ages – the time of the Crusades and the arts of courtly love. The group comprises medieval musicians Paul Leigh and Gill Page, accompanied by singer Richard de Winter. Paul founded the group 18 years ago, having become interested in the modal nature of medieval music during the course of his music degree. He originally trained as a flautist and classical guitarist, but has moved from there into recorders, whistles, lute, gittern, and bagpipes. Gill is a medieval historian with a special interest in medieval Greece; her Being Byzantine: Greek Identity before the Ottomans was published by Cambridge University Press in 2008. Her principal instrument is the harp, and she also sings and plays the medieval hurdy-gurdy. Richard de Winter is a highly experienced choral singer and historical interpreter. He was a chorister at Westminster Cathedral and a choral scholar at Durham before studying Musical Theatre at the Royal Academy of Music, and he has been singing with Trouvère since 2014.

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Keynote Lecture: Other Sexualities - The 'Natural' and the 'Unnatural' in Medieval French Ovidian Narratives

Tuesday 04 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber

13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Sylvia Huot, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge

Introduction: Hans-Werner Goetz, Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg

Ovid's Metamorphoses presents a panoply of characters who exhibit various forms of what is deemed within the text to be deviant sexuality: incest, homoeroticism, bestiality, attraction to an inanimate image. As these characters struggle with their desires, both in Ovid's text and in the many medieval French texts drawing on it, they reflect on the extent to which their condition is or is not 'natural', that is, replicated among animals. At times they seem even to be engaged in a kind of competition, as Iphis, for example, considers that her desire for another girl is even more unacceptable than that of Pasiphaë for a bull, who is at least male; or Jean de Meun's Pygmalion compares himself favourably to Narcissus in that the object of his desire does at least really exist. Exploring the medieval reception of these figures allows not only for an investigation into cultural constructions of race, gender, desire, and the lines of difference that amorous liaisons may or may not successfully bridge; but also for an analysis of the importance of sexuality in medieval conceptions of the crucial differences separating humans from other animals within the natural world.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: The Incunabula Collection

Tuesday 04 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

12.00 - 14.00

Join us for a drop-in session to see medieval treasures from Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Special Collections staff will be in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery with a selection of highlights from the collections for delegates to examine close-up.

The majority of Leeds University Library’s fine collection of incunabula were collected by Lord Brotherton of Wakefield. The collection includes several notable illustrated works such as Hartmann Schedel's Liber chronicarum (Nuremberg, 1493), the Schatzbehalter by Stephan Fridolin (Nuremberg, 1491), Bernhard von Breydenbach's Peregrinatio in terram sanctam (Mainz, 1486) and Euclid's Elementa geometriae (Venice, 1482). The collection also contains a set of the works of Ovid, printed in Parma in 1477 with copious annotations and visual marginalia.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections

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The Royal Armouries Museum

Tuesday 04 July

Price: £16.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 14.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

The Royal Armouries is the British national collection of arms and armour and Britain's oldest museum. It contains the finest collection of medieval arms and armour in the UK. This excursion to the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds will begin with a self-guided visit to the public galleries until the museum closes at 17.00, at which time participants will be met by specialist senior curatorial staff and taken to the Oriental Gallery. Participants will have the opportunity to handle original examples of medieval armour and weapons. Objects, many of which are not on general display in the museum, will be brought out for close examination and discussion.

Delegates should note that once the museum has closed they will not be permitted to move unaccompanied around the galleries, and will need to remain with the group.

The excursion will be met and conducted by Natasha Bennett, Curator of Oriental Collections, Karen Watts, Senior Curator of Armour, and Bob Woosnam-Savage, Curator of Edged Weapons.

Please visit www.royalarmouries.org/leeds for more information on the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds.

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The Tale of Jaufre

Tuesday 04 July

Price: Free

Adapted and told by: Anne Lister

University House: De Grey Room

19.00 - 20.30

Originally written in the Occitan language at the court of Aragon in the 12th or 13th century, this tale of high adventure and true love has been told and re-told over the centuries, but not often in English. Jaufre is the only medieval tale of King Arthur which survives in Occitan, and it is a fascinating tale, with versions turning up in Spain, France and even the Philippines. A chapbook version of the romance was mentioned by Cervantes as part of Don Quixote’s library.

Jaufre arrives at the court of King Arthur, hoping to be made a knight. While there, he witnesses an insult to the king and promises to bring the villain, the unpleasant Taulat de Rogimon, to justice. Along the way he meets the beautiful Brunissen and falls in love – but there are giants to deal with, as well as demons, dwarves, and a mysterious damsel with an underwater kingdom.

Anne Lister is working on a PhD at the School of Welsh at Cardiff University looking at this Arthurian romance from the point of view of a contemporary storyteller. As part of her studies, she is telling episodes from the romance to many different types of audience, with a view to discovering how the story works with modern listeners. Anne herself writes and sings songs, runs workshops, tells stories, writes novels and is at present hard at work on the thesis. She has a website at www.annelister.com where you can hear some of her music and read more about her career.

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Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: Outside Noah's Ark: Sympathy and Survival as the Waters Rise

Tuesday 04 July

Price: Free

Great Hall

19.00 - 20.00

Speaker: Jeffrey J. Cohen, Department of English, George Washington University, Washington DC

Introduction: Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol

Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America

A grim imagining of climate change and catastrophic deluge, the Noah story is a tale for our times. We frequently retell that narrative from Genesis as science or science fiction, but too often simplify its biblical complexity. Medieval authors and illustrators found in the Vulgate version of the Flood tantalizing glimpses of stories not fully related, alternative possibilities for perspective, animal tales to companion, ambivalence to plumb, potential for 'misplaced' sympathetic inclinations. Focusing upon the lively retellings of the Flood narrative in Cleanness, 'The Miller's Tale', and the Chester play of Noah's Flood as well as artistic illustrations of the ark upon the inundated Earth, this talk explores the medieval impulse to find potential in cataclysm, dwelling with those whose stories do not necessarily survive.

About the Medieval Academy of America:

The Medieval Academy is pleased once again to host the Annual Medieval Academy Lecture, an opportunity for the Academy to showcase some of the important work being done by scholars in North America. We hope you will join us for a reception immediately following the lecture, where members of the Medieval Academy staff will be available to answer questions about the Academy and its work. For more information about the Academy, please see www.medievalacademy.org. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the Medieval Academy after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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'A Ring Wound Round with Silver': A Jewellery Workshop

Tuesday 04 July

Price:£28.50

Directed by: Tanya Bentham

University House: Cloberry Room

19.00 - 21.00

Famous archaeological finds, such as the Staffordshire Hoard, reveal the Anglo-Saxon love of jewellery and other forms of personal adornment, whether in gold, silver, or even pewter. Intricate pieces could be made of gold and encrusted with garnets and minute filigree patterns, but simpler pieces could be made by twisting or plaiting silver wire.

The aim of the workshop is to produce a twisted wire ring of common Saxon type. Participants will be able to choose one of two designs – either a spiral or interlacing loops. The workshop will begin with an introduction by the tutor, including an explanation of metalworking practice. Participants will then have a chance to familiarise themselves with the techniques, using first pipe cleaners and then copper wire, before making a final version in silver.

The workshop fee includes both copper wire and enough silver to make one ring. If participants wish to make additional rings, more silver wire will be available for purchase.

Tanya Bentham has been a re-enactor for almost 30 years, working the last 20 as a professional living historian. Her main focus has always been on textiles, especially embroidery, but also making detours into costume, natural dyeing, weaving, millinery, and silversmithing. She has delivered workshops for numerous museums, schools, and community organisations throughout Yorkshire.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Otherness in the World of the Troubadours

Note: This concert replaces the earlier advertised performance of 'Minnesang as a Mirror of Otherness' which had to be cancelled due to circumstances beyond our control.

Tuesday 04 July

Price:£12.00

Performed, with commentary, by Jon Erik Schelander

Leeds Universities Catholic Chaplaincy

20.30 - 22.00

The Troubadours were songwriters who composed and performed in the 12th and 13th centuries in what is now the South of France. They created a new poetry in their songs, wildly inventive in form, with beautiful melodies. Many elements of the troubadour’s world and art was marked by tensions generated by otherness - some resolved and others, tragically, not. These weave profoundly through the whole of their history, expressed in their language and the way their songs approach issues of social standing, gender, and religion. This programme will include songs and poetry by Guilhem Peiteus, Jaufre Rudel, Bernart de Ventadorn, Guiraut de Bornelh, Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, Comtessa de Die, Peire Cardenal, Aimeric de Pegulhan, Albertet,  Rigaut de Berbezilh, Pons d’Ortaffa, and Uc de Sainte Circ. The concert will be framed by Guiraut de Bornelh’s dawn song – the Alba, ‘Reis Glorios’.  Here, in the most iconic example of ‘otherness’ in this literature,  the woman (whose voice is not heard) is poised between night and day, and between ‘the Jealous One’ and the ‘Other’, her heart’s chosen lover.

Jon Erik Schelander started singing the songs of the Troubadours 25 years ago in the Languedoc, France where Occitan, the language of the Troubadours, is still spoken. He performs these songs with the intensity that they demand. He sets the songs in their historical context with vivid storytelling, and breathes life into them with his rich voice. His work in medieval music has included publishing two Troubadour songbooks, translations of Troubadour texts and the making of musical instruments. He served for two years on the Board of Directors of CREMM – TROBAR: Gerard Zuchetto’s Centre de  Recherche et d’Expression des Musiques Medievales in Carcassonne, France. He has performed Troubadour programs for Universities, Early Music groups, Arts Centres, Folk Festivals, and the Edinburgh Fringe as well as on the radio in France and England.

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Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: Ripon Cathedral Library and Archives

Wednesday 05 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

12.00 - 14.00

Join us for a drop-in session to see medieval treasures from Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Special Collections staff will be in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery with a selection of highlights from the collections for delegates to examine close-up.

The Library of Ripon Cathedral is held on long-term deposit in Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Medieval manuscripts include a Latin Bible of c. 1260 and the Ripon Psalter of 1418. Hidden in the library are many medieval manuscript fragments, recycled to strengthen the bindings of the books. Around 70 fragments have been physically removed from the books and a much greater number remain in situ. The Ripon Dean & Chapter Archives consist of the medieval fabric and account rolls, chapter acts, and court papers.

On Friday, 7 July, Lisa Fagin Davis will present a workshop on the identification, cataloguing, and use of manuscript fragments, making use of the Ripon Cathedral collection.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections

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Stonyhurst College: The Stonyhurst Collections

Wednesday 05 July

Price: £24.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

This excursion provides a rare opportunity to explore the biggest collection of Catholic material culture in Britain held at Stonyhurst College. Participants will explore the unique story of English Catholicism told through the numerous illuminated manuscripts, vestments, prayer books, medieval embroideries, and relics given to the school by Catholic families for safekeeping during the 16th and 17th centuries. The collections reflect the salvaged culture and faith memory of proscribed English Catholics, preserved over four centuries, reinterpreted as indicators of Otherness by Catholics living on the margins of mainstream English religious and secular culture.

Originally founded in 1593 in Saint-Omer, near Calais, Stonyhurst is the oldest surviving Jesuit college in the world; it offered English Catholic pupils a sanctuary from the English Reformation. In 1794 the college was moved to its current home, a 16th-century Grade I listed building in Lancashire’s green Ribble Valley.

Among the school’s historic libraries, the Arundell Library houses many of the medieval manuscripts collection and the Arundell family book collection dating from the 15th to the mid-19th centuries. The Square Library is a theological collection, specialising in Jesuit works of the late 16th and 17th centuries. Highlights from the libraries include a 1410 manuscript of Froissart associated with Pierre de Liffol, Simon of St Alban's Homilies of Gregory, numerous horae from the 12th to the 16th centuries, including those of Jeanne, daughter of Louis IX, Elizabeth Plantagenet, and Mary Tudor, the 1354 Book of Holy Medicine by Henry Duke of Lancaster, printed books by de Worde and Caxton, and First Folios of both Shakespeare and Ben Johnson.

In addition, the college has numerous vestments dating from the 13th to the 19th centuries, with important pieces of opus anglicanum, a renowned holding of church silver, featuring English recusant plate and Flemish Baroque works. The significant relics collection includes a Thorn from the Sainte Chapelle, and a piece of the True Cross from the English Crown Jewels, relics from the catacombs, medieval bones, such as those of Chad, Becket, Modwenna, Augustine, and Thomas Cantilupe rescued during the Dissolution, in addition to Reformation relics of John Fisher, Thomas More, Edmund Campion, and others. The art collection spans the 13th to the 17th centuries and has a substantial number of Durers. There are also important groupings of natural history, Egyptology, classical remains, anthropology, and scientific instruments.

In recent history, Stonyhurst College was the study place of J.R.R. Tolkien’s son John during the Second World War. J.R.R. Tolkien regularly stayed at a guest house on the grounds, teaching a few lessons as an Oxford Professor and working on the Lord of the Rings in a classroom on the upper gallery of the college.

This excursion will take place under the expert guidance of the Collection’s curator Jan Graffius, who may be contacted via j.graffius@stonyhurst.ac.uk should participants wish to request a particular item included on the tour, subject to availability. More information on the Stonyhurst Collections can be found via www.stonyhurst.ac.uk/great-academies-the-stonyhurst-collections.

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Second Shepherds' Play: An Adaptation of the Townley Second Shepherds' Pageant for Film

Wednesday 05 July

Price: Free

Special screening with Douglas Morse (Director) and Heide Estes (Producer)

Leeds University Union: Room 6 - Roundhay

19.00 - 20.30

The Second Shepherds’ Play (or Pageant) was written in the 15th century by a playwright known to scholars today as the Wakefield Master. The comic drama focuses on Col, the nominal leader of three shepherds and their encounter with Mak, the local thief. In the middle of the night, Mak casts a spell over the three and makes off with a lamb. Arriving home, his wife Gil disguises the lamb as a baby, so that when the shepherds come knocking, they are at first fooled before discovering the deception. Exacting their revenge, they retrieve their sheep to return to the flock. That night they are visited by an angel who allows these shepherds to travel back in time to witness the birth of Christ and give him presents, making the journey from the profane dark comedy of the beginning to the sublime divinity of a miracle play.

The film was shot on a sheep farm in Swavesey, just outside of Cambridge. For this adaptation, the decision was made to keep the original Middle English text intact, though to modernise spelling and pronunciation, retaining archaic words where there was no modern equivalent. The film is scored with period music and actors are costumed in period dress. The film’s running time is 45 minutes.

The screening will begin with an introduction by director Douglas Morse and producer Heide Estes and will conclude with a question and answer session with members of the cast.

Director Douglas Morse is a professor of Media Studies and Film at The New School for Public Policy in New York City. Morse previously adapted and directed the The Summoning of Everyman, The Jew of Malta, and The Merchant of Venice. Producer Heide Estes is Professor of English at Monmouth University in New Jersey. She is the author of Old English Literary Landscapes: Ecotheory and the Anglo-Saxon Environmental Imagination, to be published by Amsterdam University Press in 2017.

The filmmakers request that delegates planning to attend RSVP on their Facebook page.

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Open Mic Night

Wednesday 05 July

Price: Free

Emmanuel Centre: Clare Chapel

20.00 - 22.00

The Universities Chaplaincy in Leeds and the IMC are joining forces for our first ever open mic night! The event will be divided into two sets: the first will be open to performances of all varieties (music, stand-up comedy, etc.) while the second will feature performances of medieval (and medieval-inspired) poetry.

This will be an informal event, rather than a concert, and refreshments will be available, so please feel free to come to have a drink, give a performance, or just to watch!

The MC for the night is Robin Fishwick. Sign up to perform on the night or, to pre-book a slot, contact r.fishwick@leeds.ac.uk.

Robin Fishwick is the Quaker Chaplain at the Universities Chaplaincy where he runs the Inspired Open Mic Nights. He is a bit of a singer/songwriter and plays a variety of instruments (some of them quite weird!).

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Lincoln Cathedral and the Bishops' Palace

Thursday 06 July

Price: £45.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Lincoln Cathedral is often hailed as one of Europe's most impressive medieval buildings. Founded by Bishop Remigius in the late 11th century, it underwent extensive rebuilding in the 12th and 13th centuries and later. Recent excavations have shown evidence of a substantial Roman building below the eastern part of the cathedral and also a late Saxon graveyard beside the west front.

This tour will explore the cathedral at close quarters, including its dramatic west front with its famous Romanesque frieze. The tour will also ascend to the upper storeys and the roofs. There will a chance to look at the medieval monuments in the cathedral and discuss their relationship to the later medieval architecture of the building in light of recent discoveries.

In the shadow of the cathedral stands the medieval Bishops' Palace. The East Hall range, with its stunning vaulted undercroft, was built by Bishop St Hugh before 1200 as his private residence, whilst the chapel range and entrance tower were built by Bishop William Alnwick, who modernised the palace in the 1430s. Together, they form one of the most impressive episcopal residences to survive in England. The palace also features a superb walled terrace garden.

Delegates will have the opportunity to discover other parts of the city via a walk encompassing the Vicars' court and the precinct, and the upper town with its steep hills and Norman Houses.

A packed lunch will be included. Delegates should be aware that this excursion will involve a great deal of walking, some of it on steep slopes and in medieval staircases.

The excursion will be led by Philip Dixon, Archaeological Consultant for Lincoln Cathedral, and Jenny Alexander, Department of Art History, University of Warwick.

More information about Lincoln Cathedral can be found at www.lincolncathedral.com. Find out more about Lincoln Medieval Bishops’ Palace at www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/lincoln-medieval-bishops-palace

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Making Leeds Medieval

Thursday 06 July

Price: Free

Leeds University Union, University Square, and the Marquee

10.30 - 18.00

As the IMC 2017 draws to a close, join us in and around University Square for a variety of activities, including a market featuring local produce and historical craft demonstrations. The Medieval Craft Fair will once again be extended to include a second day of trading during ‘Making Leeds Medieval’. Come and browse a range of hand-crafted items, including hand-bound books, clay pottery, embroidery, haberdashery, historic beads and jewellery, and leather bags and pouches.

The Historical and Archaeological Societies Fair will be scheduled to coincide with ‘Making Leeds Medieval’, providing a unique opportunity to find out more about some of the many independent groups within the UK actively involved in preserving local and national history.

Similar to previous years, ‘Making Leeds Medieval’ will also feature a birds of prey display, live music, and combat displays. The King Edward’s Living History Group will return this year with a mixture of hands-on activities, demonstrations and displays.

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Gawain Country

Thursday 06 July

Price: £40.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.30

Rediscovery of the landscape of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is the theme of this excursion, which will bring participants into the Staffordshire Peak District to explore the dramatic terrain that inspired one of the greatest English poems of the late Middle Ages.

Starting from the published research of Ralph Elliot, participants will follow the path that Gawain took from the castle Hautdesert to the Green Chapel - or from the farm once owned by the abbey of St Mary and St Benedict of Dieulacres to Lud’s Church, a large rock fissure entered through a cave-like hole in the hillside. This ‘crevice of an old crag’, which leads sideways and downwards into the earth, was recorded as the hiding place of Lollards and has long been associated with legends of headless riders and a tall man clad in Lincoln Green.

During the excursion, participants will consider landscape and local toponymy, the geological formation and context of Lud’s Church, and the hunting scenes that dominate Fitt 3 of Sir Gawain and their relationship to the hunting lodge at Swythamley, which formed part of the abbey’s endowment.

A packed lunch will be included. Participants are advised to check with the IMC desk beforehand for the latest weather information, as this will affect what they should wear to be comfortable. Robust footwear is recommended as the excursion will involve two miles of walking on varied and sometimes rough terrain.

The excursion will be guided by Richard Morris, Emeritus Professor of the University of Huddersfield and a former head of the Institute for Medieval Studies at Leeds.

For more about the locality and context, see R. W. V. Elliott’s The Gawain Country (Leeds Texts and Monographs, 1984).

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Highlights from Leeds University Library Special Collections: The Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society

Thursday 06 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Court: Treasures Gallery

12.00-14.00

Join us for a drop-in session to see medieval treasures from Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Special Collections staff will be in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery with a selection of highlights from the collections for delegates to examine close-up.

Since its foundation in 1863, the Yorkshire Archaeological Society has accumulated significant archival collections from all over Yorkshire. Many of them are records of major families, some of which date back as far as the 13th century. In 2016 these collections were deposited by the Society for safe-keeping in Special Collections at the University of Leeds, where they are again available for use by the public. The highlights of the Collection include the enormous series of surviving court rolls of the manor of Wakefield (1274-1925), the 15th-century stock book and 16th-century lease book of Fountains Abbey, the secular cartulary of Whixley, North Yorkshire (1430), and numerous early Yorkshire charters.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections

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Historical Fiction Masterclass

Thursday 06 July

Ticket Price: £10.00

Directed by: Justin Hill

Parkinson Building B.08

16.00 - 18.00

Do you aspire to be a writer? Do you have an idea or draft and need a hand getting to the next stage? Are your stories medieval in some sense, or are they leading you into the amorphous realm of historical fiction?

Following on from our round table discussion ‘Imagining the Medieval World: Popular Medievalism and Historical Fiction’, we are pleased to announce a medieval fiction masterclass. You do not need to have participated in the round table to attend the workshop, but you are warmly invited to both!

Internationally-acclaimed author Justin Hill (Viking Fire, Shieldwall, and Passing Under Heaven) will lead this workshop. Participants are asked to bring pen and paper and a broad imagination. No previous experience is necessary. There’ll be some fun and inspiring exercises to get your ideas going or to help you develop a story you’re already working on.

Justin Hill was born in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, and was brought up in York. He was educated at St Peter’s School, York, and was a member of St Cuthbert’s Society, Durham University. Shieldwall is the first of The Conquest series, which explores the events around the Battle of Hastings in 1066. It was picked by The Sunday Times as a Book of the Year. For more information about Justin Hill, see www.justinhillauthor.com.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Knaresborough Castle

Thursday 06 July

Price: £32.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.30

Dramatically situated at the top of a large cliff, Knaresborough Castle overlooks the River Nidd and the surrounding forest. Although it is not one of the biggest, best-known, or best-preserved castles in Yorkshire, its situation is stunning, its surviving features of great interest, and its history rich and varied. Founded after the conquest, Knaresborough Castle remained for most of its history a royal castle, which was usually in royal possession, but was sometimes held directly from the monarch.

An important administrative centre from which the king controlled much of the north of England, Knaresborough Castle also served as a royal hunting lodge. From here the monarch and his friends could enjoy the good sport to be found in the forest of Knaresborough, a vast area of royal land stretching from the town into the Yorkshire Dales. It was a centre for the production of arrows, the staple ammunition of the Middle Ages. The arrows were forged from iron mined and worked in and around the forest of Knaresborough and shafted with wood from local trees.

Knaresborough Castle also served as a stronghold and place of refuge. In 1170, Hugh de Morville, who held the castle from Henry II, fled there with his followers after the murder of Thomas Beckett in Canterbury Cathedral. During the Scottish incursions after the English defeat at Bannockburn, the castle served as a safe haven from the raids that devastated the town in 1318. In 1399, the newly deposed Richard II spent one night there during his journey to Pontefract Castle, where he met his death. After the battle of Marston Moor in July 1644, the castle was besieged and finally surrendered when cannon breached the wall. Parliament ordered that the castle be rendered untenable, but the tower was left standing to serve as a prison.

What survives today is mostly from the 14th century and includes inner and outer baileys, the main gate built by Edward I, and the King’s Tower, the heart of the royal residence. Incised on the walls of the stairs leading to the cellar of the King’s Tower are representations of arrow-heads, perhaps a record of some of those that were made locally for the king’s use. Especially unusual and fascinating are two subterranean medieval sally ports, one of which can be visited.

Whilst in Knaresborough the excursion will also take in the remarkable early 15th-century rock-cut Chapel of Our Lady of the Crag and also the 12th-century hermit’s cave of St Robert of Knaresborough. Before heading back to Leeds, a stop at Aldborough’s Parish Church, St Andrew, will complete the excursion.

This excursion will be led by Kelly DeVries from the Department of History at Loyola College, Maryland and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage, Curator of European Edged Weapons, Royal Armouries, Leeds.

For further information about Knaresborough Castle and the Chapel of Our Lady of the Crag, please visit www.knaresborough.co.uk/history

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Workshop: How Medievalists Can Engage a Wider Audience

Friday 07 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: Medievalists.net

Parkinson Building: Room B.08

Tutor: Peter Konieczny, Medievalists.net

09.30 - 12.30

Scholars in the field of medieval studies learn how to write dissertations and journal articles, but what about writing for websites and magazines? What are the differences in style and content? How does one tell the stories of the Middle Ages to an audience that is not as familiar with the history as your colleagues, and get them to understand and be engaged with the past? This workshop will offer ideas on how to write for a wider audience.

Peter Konieczny was a librarian at the University of Toronto before becoming part-owner of Medievalists.net. He has been developing websites for 15 years and is based in Toronto. Peter has extensive experience in web design, blogging, social media, and the use of digital media to support the dissemination of scholarship to wide-ranging audiences. In 2016 he also became the editor of Medieval Warfare magazine.

Since 2008, Medievalists.net has billed itself as the media site for the Middle Ages, offering news, articles, and videos about medieval studies. It is one of the largest online resources about the Middle Ages, receiving over three-quarters of a million page views per month and with a large social media following of over 42,000 followers on Twitter alone.

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Workshop: Central Government, Courts, Commemoration, and the Church: Medieval Records and The National Archives

Friday 07 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: The National Archives, Kew

Tutors: Sean Cunningham The National Archives, Kew, Paul Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew, Euan Roger, The National Archives, Kew, and Marianne Wilson, The National Archives, Kew

Parkinson Building: Room B.09

09.30 - 13.30

For all medievalists the ability to locate, read, and understand archival sources is fundamental to their research whatever their discipline and stage in their career. The National Archives of the United Kingdom (TNA) holds one of the world’s largest and most important collections of medieval records. The vast archive of English royal government informs almost every aspect of medieval life from the royal court to the peasantry, land ownership and tenure, the law, warfare and diplomacy, trade and manufacture, transport, credit and debt, death and memory, material culture, literature, art and music. However, finding, using, and interpreting the rich diversity of material is not always entirely straightforward, and its potential for a wide range of research uses often unclear. This workshop will offer an introduction to TNA, show you how to begin your research into its collections, and access research support. A course-pack with facsimiles of original documents will be used to illustrate the range of disciplines and topics TNA records can inform and illuminate. Short, themed sessions will also introduce attendees to the Mechanics of Medieval Government, Law and Justice, Piety and Material Culture, and the Church and Politics.

This workshop is aimed at all medievalists, from masters students through to experienced academics in any discipline, who wish to discover more about the rich archive collections at TNA and how they might use them in their research. There are no pre-requisites for attending the workshop, although a basic knowledge of Latin is recommended.

Sean Cunningham is Head of Medieval & Early Modern and specialises in 15th- and 16th-century records of English royal government. Euan Roger is a Medieval Records Specialist whose research has focussed on church, government, and law in the late Middle Ages. Paul Dryburgh is a Principal Medieval Records Specialist with interests in government, politics, and warfare in the British Isles in the 13th and 14th centuries. Marianne Wilson is the Early Modern Research Associate (Reformation Programme), who specialises in the transition between the late medieval and early modern church.

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Workshop: Fragments and Bindings from Ripon Cathedral

Friday 07 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Tutors: Lisa Fagin Davis, Medieval Academy of America, Massachusetts and Rhiannon M. Lawrence-Francis, Special Collections, Leeds University Library

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

10.00 - 14.00

Lisa Fagin Davis will present a workshop on the identification, cataloguing, and use of manuscript fragments. Making use of the Ripon Cathedral collection and drawing from her own work cataloguing hundreds of fragments and leaves in U.S. collections, she will demonstrate how to identify, classify, and affiliate binding fragments, both in and ex situ, and will explore the opportunities for virtual reconstruction made possible by recent developments in digital humanities. She will also discuss the importance of working with fragments as a way to understand medieval books and their post-medieval histories.

The library and archive of Ripon Cathedral was deposited at the Brotherton Library in 1980. In addition to early printed books, incunabula, and archival records, the deposit includes several boxes of early manuscript fragments that were removed from Ripon library bindings in which they had been used as covers, flyleaves, pastedowns, and binding stays (books with fragments still in situ will serve to demonstrate these various structures). The presence at Brotherton of not only the fragments but also the actual bindings they supported will provide workshop participants with a rare opportunity to study the relationship between the two types of resources. Because the binding source of each fragment was (fortuitously and remarkably) noted when the leaves were removed, we can directly observe how material evidence on the fragments relates to the bindings in which they were used and - conversely - how trace evidence in the bindings can still be observed on the fragments.

Lisa Fagin Davis received her PhD in Medieval Studies from Yale University in 1993. She has catalogued medieval manuscript collections throughout the United States and is, with Melissa Conway, co-author of the Directory of Collections in the United States and Canada with Pre-1600 Manuscript Holdings, published by the Bibliographical Society of America. She regularly promotes North American collections of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts on her blog, ‘The Manuscript Road Trip’, and was a co-curator of the 2016 exhibition Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections. Since 2013, she has served as Executive Director of the Medieval Academy of America.

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Terms and Conditions

Events

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel events due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Excursions

We recommend that you reserve your place on the excursions by registering as early as possible, as seats on the coach will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Please make a note of how participation in the excursions will affect your meal requirements, and note also the time of departure from and return to the University of Leeds in relation to other commitments, and book accordingly. Sensible footwear is recommended, as the wearing of high-heeled shoes is impractical at most sites, and prohibited at some. Most excursions will involve a significant amount of walking and/or standing, please contact the IMC if you have any questions or concerns about a particular excursion. It would also be advisable to bring raincoats. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We ask that those participating in excursions arrive at the steps of the Parkinson Building 15 minutes before the excursion is due to leave. A member of staff will be present in this area to provide information.

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel excursions due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Prices for the excursions include coach transport, entrance fees and donations to the sites, fees for the guides, staffing, and administration costs. Meals are not included in the price unless otherwise indicated.

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