IMC 2016 Public Events

This year's programme of public IMC events and excursions features an exciting and unique mix of performances and practical workshops, as well as exploratory and exclusive excursions to sites of historical interest. Please click on the events below for further details.

Public events, excursions, and workshops can be booked via the University of Leeds Online Store.

Events and workshops will take place across the University of Leeds Campus and all excursions will depart from the Parkinson steps. For more details on the location of events, excursions, and workshops view a map of the Congress site.

The IMC 2016 Public Events Leaflet is coming soon.

Further information is available by emailing imc@leeds.ac.uk.

Thursday 30 June | Sunday 03 July | Monday 04 July | Tuesday 05 July | Wednesday 06 July | Thursday 07 July | Friday 08 July

Thursday 30 June 2016

Excursion 1: Pre-Congress Tour - Castles of East Anglia

£650.00 / £800.00

Sunday 03 July 2016

Free Event: Medieval Day at the Museum

FREE

Excursion 2: Fountains Abbey

£39.50

Excursion 3: Skipton Castle

£27.00

Workshop 1: 'When I perhaps compounded am with clay': Pottery Workshop

£21.50

Workshop 2: Hear, Feel, See, and Taste: Chanting with Sensitivity

£12.00

Free Event: Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Free Event: Open Mic Night

FREE

International Medieval Film Festival: Macbeth (2015)

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society )

FREE

Monday 04 July 2016

Free Event: Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Free Event: Keynote Lectures: 'The Colour Shall Be Green': Food and Chromaticism in the Later Middle Ages / The Shifting Paradigm of Medieval Food Crises: Researching Dearth and Famine

FREE

Free Event: Exhibition: Later-Day Saints

FREE

Free Event: A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Nick Trustram Eve from The Copper Pot exploring medieval spices

FREE

Free Event: Keynote Lecture: The Taste of Food

FREE

Free Event: Special Lecture: Riches Revealed - Medieval Archives in the Collections of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society

FREE

Excursion 4: Markenfield Hall

£26.50

Free Event: Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Who Are You? - Identifying Individuals in the Early Middle Ages

FREE

Event 1: 'Felix Thomas, lumen mundi': Chants from the Feasts of St Thomas Aquinas

£12.00

International Medieval Film Festival: The Message (2015)

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

£7.50 - concessions apply
FREE for all IMC delegates

Tuesday 05 July 2016

Free Event: Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Free Event: A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Julia & Nigel Gant of 4and20 Blackbirds Baking Sweets & Desserts

FREE

Free Event: Keynote Lecture: Cookbooks, Health Books, Drug Manuals: Culinary Recipes in Search of a Genre

FREE

Free Event: Special Lecture: Exploring Medieval Texts In The Modern Age

FREE

Excursion 5: Pontefract Castle and All Saints Church

£24.50

International Medieval Film Festival: Marketa Lazarová (1967)

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

£7.50 - concessions apply
FREE for all IMC delegates

Event 2: 'Swich A Feeste and Revel Make': A Medieval Feast

£45.00

Free Event: Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: Manuscript Edges, Marginal Time: Why Medieval Matters

FREE

Event 3: Feast and Folly in Arthurian Epic: Hartmann Von Aue's Iwein

£12.50

Wednesday 06 July 2016

Free Event: A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Julia & Nigel Gant of 4and20 Blackbirds Making Bread & Butter

FREE

Free Event: Medieval Craft Fair

FREE

Free Event: Special Lecture: While Shepherds Ate

FREE

Excursion 6: Kirkstall Abbey

£16.00

Event 4: 'First Thing On The Table': A Sampling of Traditional Cheeses from Northern England

FULLY BOOKED

Free Event: Mankind

FREE

Thursday 07 July 2016

Excursion 7: Durham Cathedral

£39.50

Free Event: A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Caroline Yeldham Cooking Soups & Stews

FREE

Free Event: Making Leeds Medieval

FREE

Free Event: Historical & Archaeological Societies Fair

FREE

Excursion 8: Great Halls of York: Merchant Adventurers’, Merchant Taylors’, and Barley Halls

£25.50

Workshop 3: ‘Let The Spinning Wheel Turn’: A Spinning Workshop

FULLY BOOKED

Excursion 9: Foraging in the Neighbourhood: A Walking Tour of the University of Leeds Campus

£7.00

Consultation and 'Public Medievalism': A Round Table Discussion

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

International Medieval Film Festival: Aus dem Leben der Hildegard von Bingen (2009)

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Friday 08 July 2016

Workshop 4: Digital Media and Medieval Studies: How to Create a Professional and Financially Sustainable Future for Your Research Online – A Workshop

£7.50

Workshop 5: Government, Law, Land, and Ceremony: Medieval Records at the National Archives - A Workshop

£7.50

Pre-Congress Tour - Castles of East Anglia

Thursday 30 June 2016 to Sunday 3 July

Price: £650.00 / £800.00 including single supplement

This year the IMC Post-Congress Tour will be a ‘Pre-Congress’ Tour, venturing east to East Anglia, concentrating on the coastal counties of Lincolnshire, Norfolk, and Suffolk. Although not large in number, the fortifications seen here reflect its long history as a border between sea and land, with castles a conspicuous feature of the predominantly flat landscape. Although comparatively heavily populated and close to the medieval capital of London and the South, these counties were to a degree ‘off the beaten track’ and, even today, are notorious for their lack of major transport links; in the medieval period, it was the ports and the sea which often provided the easiest links to cities like London.

The sites to be visited range from Roman shore forts of the 3rd century to the splendid fortified residences of the later Middle Ages. The majority of East Anglian castles have their roots in the campaigns in the aftermath of the Norman Conquest as the Normans extended their control of the British Isles. Some lie on the routes and roads taken by warring bands fighting to gain control over this land or passing through on the way to further conquest. Other castles lie on the coast facing enemies that might use the North Sea for invasion. The castles of East Anglia saw a number of military actions, ranging from local sieges, such as Bungay in 1174 to the besieging of Norwich castle by Louis, the son of the King of France, in 1217.

Many of the castles in this part of England are noted for their formidable earthworks and their surviving stonework, often of the ubiquitous local flint. Following their Norman establishment no more than about 30 earth and timber castles were later rebuilt in stone. Often knapped flint and free stone were used together to produce various patterns – 'flushwork' – and this became the signature stonework for many of the medieval buildings in the area. Most of the stone built castles are built around a central tower, such as Norwich, Castle Rising, Castle Acre, Bungay, and Orford, but a castle like Framlingham points to different developments. The use of brick, allegedly introduced by Flemish workers (although just as likely the result of a lack of stone and timber for framing), will also be found. Some castles, such as Tattershall, included Flemish 'brickies' amongst its builders between 1432-8, who created what has been described as 'the finest piece of medieval brick-work in England'.

Some of the castles are noble or royal, such as Norwich and Orford. Some nobles appear to have copied royal styles, such as William d’Albini whose castle at Castle Rising bears a very similar plan to the royal castle at Norwich. In the process they also built to strengthen their own baronial powers, and in fact Orford was built by Henry II in response to Hugh Bigod who rebelled against Henry in 1156, but was crushed by royalist forces. After paying Henry a huge fine the Bigods strongholds, such as Bungay, Thetford, and Framlingham, were restored to Hugh, only for him to rebel again in 1173-4. Unsurprisingly Hugh never regained the king's favour!

These castles include a range of different medieval military engineering and architectural styles set in a variety of land and coastal seascapes. And, as ever, the tour provides an opportunity for you to explore and compare some of these evocative castles in one trip. The tour will be based in Norwich itself, allowing participants the chance to discover the riverside walks, pubs, old cobbled lanes and streets of the city, and, of course, Norwich Cathedral, one of the finest cathedrals in England.

The current itinerary includes

  • Tattershall Castle
  • Castle Rising Castle
  • Norwich Castle
  • Bungay Castle
  • Burgh Castle
  • Thetford Castle
  • Framlingham Castle
  • Orford Castle
  • Castle Acre
  • Lincoln Castle

This tour will once again be led by Kelly DeVries, Professor of the Department of History, Loyola University, Maryland and Honorary Historical Consultant to the Royal Armouries and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage, Curator of European Edged Weapons, Royal Armouries, Leeds.

We recommend that you reserve your place on this excursion by completing the Registration Form as early as possible. Sensible footwear is recommended, as there will be a significant amount of walking on uneven surfaces and climbing steep stone steps. It would also be advisable to bring raincoats and sunblock. The price of the tour includes entry to sites, individual site guidebooks, travel, three nights’ accommodation (ensuite), with breakfast, dinners, and packed lunches. The programme may be subject to change.

The Pre-Congress Tour is organised in association with the Royal Armouries.

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Fountains Abbey

Sunday 03 July

Price: £39.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 10.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.30

Fountains Abbey is one of the best preserved and most important medieval Cistercian monasteries in Europe. It is also one of the most intensely studied. An adoptive daughter-house of Clairvaux, it is in fact three monasteries, two of which can still be identified from the standing ruins. Built first of timber in 1133, it was replaced by a modest stone monastery between 1136 and 1144, and was then rebuilt on a massive scale from the mid-1150s as the mother-house of a substantial family.

This tour will examine the church and cloister ranges, looking at the remains of the first and second stone monasteries, and placing them in the context of early Cistercian planning. It will also look at the early 12th-century and later mill, identified as the oldest surviving watermill in Europe, and the remains of the abbey wool house, both buildings which mirror the development of the cloister buildings. Additionally, the onsite English Heritage Kitchen Bank store with its large collection of loose architectural detail containing material from lost and badly damaged buildings will be made accessible to us. For their own safety participants are advised to wear sturdy shoes, as the path leading up to the store is not usually open the public and therefore not as secure.

The guides for this excursion are Glyn Coppack, Archaeological and Historical Research, and Stuart Harrison, Ryedale Archaeological Services and Cathedral Archaeologist at York. A packed lunch will be included.

For more information about Fountains Abbey go to www.fountainsabbey.org.uk

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Medieval Day at the Museum

Sunday 03 July

Price: Free

Leeds City Museum: Broderick Room

12.00 - 16.00

Join us at the Broderick Room, 12.00-15.00, in the Leeds City Museum to experience Medieval Day at the Museum, where you will have a chance to immerse yourself in medieval-inspired crafts and activities for all ages. Come to the Scribe’s Workshop to try writing with quill and ink, and learn about natural materials used to make medieval pigments, on display from the Leeds City Museums Collections. Learn to play medieval games and some of the intricacies of medieval heraldry. To coincide with the 950th anniversary of the Norman Conquest and the theme of this year’s Congress, we will also learn about food-related words of Anglo-Norman origins still in circulation in modern English.

Medieval day festivities will conclude at 15.00-16.00 with a talk by Catherine Karkov (School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds) about the West Yorkshire Hoard in the context of Anglo-Saxon metalwork in England. The 'West Yorkshire Hoard', a group of seven objects dating to 7th to 11th centuries, was found by a metal detectorist in the Leeds Metropolitan area in 2008-09. Six of the objects are gold, the most spectacular item being a stunning gold ring with a lozenge-shaped bezel set with a garnet gem which is in near-perfect condition.

Visitors will also have a chance to view the display of the West Yorkshire Hoard, now on permanent display at the Leeds City Museum alongside Anglo-Saxon cross fragments from Leeds Parish Church and finds from Kirkstall Abbey.

Leeds City Museum, originally established in 1819, reopened in September 2008 in the stunning Leeds Institute Building built by Cuthbert Broderick in 1865-68. The collections ranging from ancient finds to natural history are housed in six galleries. Highlights from the collections include the Leeds Tiger, Nesyammun the mummy, and the West Yorkshire Hoard.

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Skipton Castle

Sunday 03 July

Price: £27.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Delegates will be taken up the valley of the River Aire for about 25 miles to the popular market town of Skipton, known locally as ‘the Gateway to the Dales’ for its position on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. A brief tour of the earliest part of the market town from c. 1205 will show the sites of the medieval fulling and corn mills, and allow an appreciation of the High Street, which has been voted the best in Britain by the Urban Academy. The layout and earliest remains of domestic buildings will be discussed, and a walk along the Eller Beck and through Skipton Woods, part of the medieval hunting park, will allow a view of the castle on its limestone cliff overlooking the site of medieval fish ponds and the mill race.

The siting and interior of the medieval parish church of Holy Trinity will be explored and a tour of the castle will follow. The castle’s vast kitchen fireplaces, serving hatch and grand hall, with pantry, buttery, and early charcoal cooking fittings remain after Civil War slighting and extensive repairs by Lady Anne Clifford from 1648.

A timber castle was built soon after 1090 by Robert de Romille, but was destroyed by Scots in 1152. The earliest remaining part of the stone castle dates from approximately 1200, built by William de Forz, father and son. Subsequent lords improved and extended the castle and town. Edward II bestowed the ‘Castle, Manor and Lands of Skipton’ on Robert Clifford in 1310, who added to its fabric. The Cliffords retained the castle, despite short absences, until 1676. Extension and modernisation was undertaken for the marriage of Henry Clifford to a relative of Henry VII in 1487, following Richard III’s lordship. The fine Tudor 1536 east wing is visible from the outside only, as this is the home of the present owners. Later additions to the castle include a rare survival of a 17th-century shell grotto, decorated with simulated coral and ormer shells, designed by Issac de Caus. Lady Anne Clifford had the family motto ‘desormais’ (‘henceforth’) carved above the gatehouse. In 1676 the castle and estates passed to the Hothfields, absentee landlords, and the castle was sold to the Fattorini family in 1959.

The tour will be guided by Susan Wrathmell, MA, IHBC, an historic buildings consultant and chair of Skipton Civic Society. She has co-ordinated an English Heritage research project on Skipton's historic buildings and continues to research buildings in the town.

For more information about Skipton Castle go to www.skiptoncastle.co.uk

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'When I perhaps compounded am with clay': Pottery Workshop

Sunday 03 July

Price: £21.50

Directed by: Lee Steele

Leeds University Union: Room 6 - Roundhay

14.00 - 17.00

There was a range of variation in burial practice among the Anglo-Saxon peoples in early medieval England, with both cremation and inhumation utilised for the elite as well as more commonplace burials. Following a cremation, the ashes were gathered and then buried within an urn. These funerary urns were typically hand-made from clay and decorated with various designs using bosses, stamps, and incised lines as well as freehand designs and motifs, such as swastikas.

This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to create and decorate an Anglo-Saxon funerary urn. Under the direction of Yorkshire potter Lee Steele, they will learn to construct pottery using the coiling technique, in which ropes of clay are used to construct bowls, vases, or other vessels. After the workshop, participants can either take their urn away or have it fired and posted back to them within the UK for an additional charge. Examples of different clay types and replica pottery will also be on display.

After studying 3D design at York College of Further & Higher Education, Lee Steele went on to run his own pottery studio and gallery in Robin Hoods Bay, North Yorkshire and has subsequently worked in schools, colleges, and specialist care settings for over 15 years, teaching and inspiring students of all abilities and ages to ‘have a go’. His own interests and inspirations include historical pottery, specifically Early Medieval which is born of many years as a historical re-enactor taking part in Late Roman, Saxon and Viking events both throughout the UK and Norway.

The Potter Man Studio is based in East Yorkshire where Lee runs pottery classes for adults and children and produces studio ceramics and replica historical pottery. For further information, visit www.thepotterman.co.uk.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Hear, Feel, See, and Taste: Chanting with Sensitivity

Sunday 03 July

Price: £12.00

Directed by: Hilkka-Lissa Vuori & Johanna Korhonen

Leeds Universities Catholic Chaplaincy

14.00 - 17.00

'Felix thomas doctor ecclesie lumen mundi splendor ytalie [...]’ (Blessed is Thomas, Doctor of the Church, light of the world, splendour of Italy)

St Thomas Aquinas is perhaps best known for his scholarship, making him an obvious choice to serve as the patron saint of students and universities. His great works, the Summa Theologica and the Summa Contra Gentiles, are mainstays of Catholic theology. Less well-known, however, is his contribution to the liturgy of the medieval Christian Church, composing for example the liturgy for Corpus Christi when the feast day was added to the Church’s calendar in 1264.

This workshop will focus on chants performed on the feast days of Thomas Aquinas found in 14th-century manuscripts. Participants will learn to use early medieval scales, called modes, which use a different tuning system, based on natural harmonic series. This singing technique allows the overtones of the music to be heard and distinguished from the melody as flute-like sounds. The feeling of the mode and resonance in the body and in the church space helps us to experience also the modes of the melodies and the texts. Participants will also learn to use their hands in their performance to follow the vocal resonance in the singer’s body. This technique naturally lends itself to the setting of a chapel. The workshop will include a short talk about St Thomas Aquinas by Marika Räsänen (Turku Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (TUCEMEMS), University of Turku).

This workshop is open to singers of all levels of ability and vocal range. Copies of the music will be made available on the day. However, the ability to read the musical notes is not needed, just a will to join the singing.

Hilkka-Liisa Vuori, who has a doctorate in music, has been singing with Vox Silentii, an early music ensemble focusing on liturgical music, since its inception in 1992. She also teaches at the University of the Arts in Helsinki. Vuori specialises in medieval Bridgettine chants, her most recent publication being a chant book for choirs, Cantus sororum. Currently she is transcribing, studying, and singing the chants from the two offices of Thomas Aquinas.

Johanna Korhonen is a singer in duo Vox Silentii and a professional journalist specialising in societal issues.

Marika Räsänen has studied the cult of saints and in particular the relic cult of St Thomas Aquinas in southern Italy. Her research interests include the early Dominican reforms and the Reformation, the devotional culture of the laity, and the cult of Thomas Aquinas in late medieval Europe. Among her most recent publications are articles on the cult of St Francis of Assisi in medieval Rauma and diocese of Turku and on the perception of silence in the late medieval lay culture (composed jointly with Reima Välimäki).

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

For further information about Vox Silentii, please see www.voxsilentii.fi. For further information about the ongoing project ‘Touching, Tasting, Hearing, Seeing, and Smelling: Sensory Experiences in the Feasts of St Thomas Aquinas’, please see ossagloriosa.org.

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Open Mic Night

Sunday 03 July

Price: Free

Emmanuel Centre: Clare Chapel

19.30 - 22.00

The Universities Chaplaincy in Leeds and the IMC are joining forces for our first ever open mic night! The event will be divided into two sets: the first will be open to performances of all varieties (music, stand-up comedy, etc.) while the second will feature performances of medieval (and medieval-inspired) poetry.

This will be an informal event, rather than a concert, and refreshments will be available, so please feel free to come to have a drink, give a performance, or just to watch!

MCs for the night are Robin Fishwick and Oz Hardwick. Sign up to perform on the night or, to pre-book a slot, contact p.hardwick@leedstrinity.ac.uk.

Robin Fishwick is the Quaker Chaplain at the Universities Chaplaincy where he runs the Inspired Open Mic Nights. He is a bit of a singer/songwriter and plays a variety of instruments (some of them quite weird!).

Oz Hardwick is the author of five poetry collections and countless individual poems which have been published internationally. As Paul Hardwick, he has published extensively on medieval misericords and animal iconography and is Programme Leader for English and Writing at Leeds Trinity University.

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Keynote Lectures: 'The colour shall be green': Food and Chromaticism in the Later Middle Ages / The Shifting Paradigm of Medieval Food Crises: Researching Dearth and Famine

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Great Hall

9.00 - 10.30

Speaker: Christopher Woolgar, Department of History, University of Southampton and Pere Benito i Monclús, Departament d'Història, Universitat de Lleida

Introduction: Paul Freedman, Department of History, Yale University

'The colour shall be green': Food and Chromaticism in the Later Middle Ages

Colour is intimately associated with our appreciation of food, yet we must not expect the hues and lustre of medieval foods to have offered the messages we might anticipate. For medieval people, colour provided important information about the nature of objects, and that was no less true of what they ate than of anything else. On one level colour might expose moral and spiritual connotations, on another it might offer indications of characteristics of a foodstuff according to medieval humoral theories. Beyond this, a few texts - medieval recipe books - tell us about the creation of colour and food. Display was a crucial part of elite cuisine, and control of colour was essential. Recipes instructed cooks how to colour dishes and to add verisimilitude to made dishes. Heraldic colours and designs were employed for ‘subtleties’, the set pieces that came to table with wider messages. There were general cultural associations between colours and culinary preparations: some types of dish show common patterns of colouring, such as the use of green sauce for fish, and red for dishes known as ‘Saracen’. However fleeting the colours of foodstuffs, they offer a further dimension to our understanding of meals and the material culture of dining.

The Shifting Paradigm of Medieval Food Crises: Researching Dearth and Famine

In the past 20 years, pre-modern food crises have moved from being considered an object of study firmly limited to the past to becoming a complex subject requiring a thorough historiographical renewal in light of contemporary research and theories of distribution. Two independent dynamics have come together to create this paradigm shift. The first is the development of new research into food crises which focuses especially on the European Mediterranean, has been launched by ground-breaking French and Spanish research programmes on the Crisis of the Late Middle Ages and on medieval food crises. The second is the reception of models of economic research addressing present-day crises of subsistence in the Third World, especially the ‘Entitlement approach’ by Amartya Sen (arguing in its core that famine is not caused simply by a lack of food, but also by people’s inability to access existing food), and by its advocates and critics. This lecture will offer an overview of these developments and some of their major achievements, as well as looking at future perspectives that lie ahead in the study of medieval famine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, firstserved basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Exhibition: Later-Day Saints

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Stage@leeds: Foyer

09.00 - 18.00

Saints and saints’ lives have long been studied by medievalists as important sources for the understanding of life and faith during the Middle Ages. Centuries later, the saints remain relevant, with certain saints even becoming patrons of very modern concepts. In 1999 a movement sprang up among Catholic dot-com workers, petitioning St John Paul II to make St Isidore of Seville the patron saint of the internet.

Visit Stage@leeds throughout the Congress to see a modern artist’s twist on a very old tradition. Later-Day Saints is an art exhibition, which showcases work by Alan Birch, who has been working on a series of prints for the past two years. Taking the wood carvings of saints in the Wellcome Collection at the Science Museum in London as his starting point, Birch has taken the idea of the iconography of medieval saints and modernised it to fit the fascinations and obsessions of the 21st-century world.

Alan Birch is an artist working out of Prospect Studios in Waterfoot, Lancashire. He works predominantly in print, but has worked with a variety of other media including drawing, metal, and digital images. His work is imbued with his own unique sense of humour, offering a personalised view of the contemporary world. Birch is also a committed educator, running regular print workshops in his studio, in schools and galleries, and more recently in Manchester hospitals as part of the Culture Arts programme.

This event is free of charge, and will be on display throughout the Congress

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A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Nick Trustram Eve from The Copper Pot Exploring Medieval Spices

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

University Square

10.00 - 17.00

Come entice your senses on University Square, which will feature a different food-related display each day of the Congress. Experience different types of medieval food in a range of cooking and/or handling demonstrations, giving visitors a chance to see, smell, touch, and taste the Middle Ages. Smell spices and learn how they changed the way people cooked, feast your eyes (and taste buds) on the sweet treats available to the elite, watch the making of bread from scratch with a travelling bread oven, and immerse your senses in the making of soups and stews over an open fire. Whenever you visit, the changing food display is sure to pique your interest and stimulate your senses!

Monday will feature Nick Trustram Eve from The Copper Pot who will be exploring the use of spices from the Middle Ages into the early modern period. Join Nick to discover how spices changed the ways in which people cooked.

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Keynote Lecture: The Taste of Food

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber

13.00 - 14.00

Massimo Montanari, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà, Università di Bologna

Introduction: Paul Freedman, Department of History, Yale University

Taste is an ambiguous word that refers either to the physiological sensation that begins in the body by contact with food, or the aesthetic evaluation that a particular society places on the gustatory experience (also in the metaphorical sense, in areas not only of gastronomy but also and above all else of art, literature, or music). Taste in its first meaning is an individual and biological attitude. Taste in its second meaning (understood now as Good Taste) becomes a collective and cultural attitude. This lecture sets out to show how the respective importance of these two meanings was modified over time - between the Medieval and Modern period - with a progressive disequilibrium away from the first to the second. It aims to show how both concepts might discover an essential affinity in the ‘principle of knowledge’ which, moreover, allows utilisation of the idea of Taste in a metaphorical sense; and how, through such a principle, the medieval ideal of Taste (restricted to the act of eating and particularly understood as a spontaneous datum) prepares the modern idea of Good Taste (extended to other activities and mostly as a cultural datum, that is, as the fruit of social learning) which, in turn, allows elaboration of the very idea of Food Taste as a Good Taste culturally learned.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, firstserved basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Special Lecture: Riches Revealed - Medieval Archives in the Collections of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

13.00 - 14.00

Sylvia Thomas, Yorkshire Archaeological Society

Introduction: Rhiannon M. Lawrence-Francis, Special Collection, Leeds University Library

Since its foundation in 1863, the Yorkshire Archaeological Society has accumulated significant archive collections from all over Yorkshire, many of them records of major families, some of which date back as far as the 13th century.

In 2015 all these collections were deposited by the Society for safekeeping in the University of Leeds, Brotherton Library Special Collections, where they are again available for use by the public. Join us for this Lunchtime Talk to learn about the highlights of the Collection, including the enormous series of surviving court rolls of the manor of Wakefield (1274-1925), the 15th-century stock book and 16thcentury lease book of Fountains Abbey, the secular cartulary of Whixley, North Yorkshire (1430), and numerous early Yorkshire charters, among others.

The talk will be given by Sylvia Thomas, a past president of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society and retired County Archivist of West Yorkshire. Sylvia is the Joint Editor of the West Riding and Derbyshire volumes of Records of Early English Drama.

The session will take place in The Sheppard Room, accessed via the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, where some of these items will be on display. Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres (4.3 miles) of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection, the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, the Archives of the Dean & Chapter of Ripon, the Roth Collection, and the Oriental Manuscript Collection. The Reading Room of Special Collections is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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Markenfield Hall

Monday 04 July

Price: £26.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

This excursion offers the opportunity to visit Markenfield Hall, the unspoiled 14th-century moated manor house built by John de Markenfield, canon of York and Chancellor of the Exchequer under Edward II. The first mention of the Hall comes in the Domesday Book of 1086, and a house in one form or another has stood on the site to this day, with the earliest part of today's house dating to 1230. By 1150 the estate had become the possession of the le Bret family. Whether they purchased it from, or were descended from, the owners in 1086 is unclear. The le Brets were increasingly called after the land on which they lived - de Markenfield - this became the family name, and they, in turn, became one of Yorkshire's most influential and significant families. The Hall remained within the hands of the Markenfield family, who provided soldiers for all of the English campaigns, until it was lost following Thomas Markenfield's participation in the Northern Rebellion of 1569. Markenfield Hall has been the subject of much recent study and more is now known about the building history of what has been called the finest fortified manor house in England, set within the original park and surrounded by water.

Participants will have the opportunity to see the Hall’s beautiful four-poster bedroom, the impressive Tudor gatehouse, and what has been described as the most unusual utility room in North Yorkshire. There will be a chance to walk around the moat and observe Markenfield’s splendid architecture from every angle and to hear about 700 years of history, political and religious disagreement, and the battle to save a much-loved family home.

The guide for this excursion will be Jenny Alexander, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick.

For more information about Markenfield Hall, go to www.markenfield.com

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Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Who Are You? - Identifying Individuals in the Early Middle Ages

Monday 04 July

Price: Free

Michael Sadler Building: Rupert Beckett Theatre

19.00 - 20.00

Sponsor: Early Medieval Europe

Paul E. Dutton, Department of Humanities, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

Introduction: Marios Costambeys, Department of History, University of Liverpool, and Simon MacLean, School of History, University of St Andrews

Several times on his way to Jerusalem, the pilgrim monk Bernard had to acquire proofs of identification, writs of safe passage (amān) that described his appearance and the purpose of his journey, before he could proceed, and he had to carry those documents with him on his journey at all times. It should not surprise us that he did not fully understand Muslim identity papers, for nothing quite like them existed in western Europe at the time. Why? How did people identify and describe each other in the early medieval west? How did they avoid mistaking one person for another? Identification and identity should not be conflated, for the former is a determination made by others, while the latter belongs to the possession and development of the self or, more simply, the movement from ‘you’ to ‘I’.

The modern world is filled with manifold techniques of identification, but there are over seven billion of us and global society has an interest in the precise identification or separation of individuals, which begins at birth and follows us throughout our lives. The early medieval west may have lacked such precise forms of identification, but its various ways of identifying people deserve closer examination since they belong to and describe particular societies. Imposture, for instance, is a problem that runs through the Merovingian history of Gregory of Tours but is relatively rare among the Carolingians. Bernard may have required official papers only outside Europe, but even Carolingian estate holders needed to be able to identify and account for the people on their lands. Dreamers needed to be able to distinguish between one saint and another in their dreams and foreign emissaries needed to know whom they were to meet. Mistakes were made, awkward social moments arose, and repairs required. Exploring all of this has much to tell us about early medieval society and the ways in which it understood itself, its people, and their relations with each other.

The journal Early Medieval Europe (published by Wiley) is very pleased to sponsor the Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture at the International Medieval Congress. By contributing a major scholarly lecture to the Congress programme the journal aims to highlight the importance of the Congress to scholars working in early medieval European history and to support further research in this field. Early Medieval Europe is an interdisciplinary journal encouraging the discussion of archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, diplomatic, literature, onomastics, art history, linguistics and epigraphy, as well as more traditional historical approaches. It covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, Ireland, the British Isles, Scandinavia and Continental Europe (both west and east). Further information about the journal and details on how to submit material to it are available at http://eu.wiley.com/. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the editorial board after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, firstserved basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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'Felix Thomas, lumen mundi': Chants from the Feasts of St Thomas Aquinas

Monday 04 July

Price: £12.00

Performed By: Vox Silentii

Leeds Universities Catholic Chaplaincy

20.30 - 22.00

Established in 1992, Vox Silentii (Johanna Korhonen and Hilkka-Liisa Vuori) sings, teaches, and studies the music of medieval convents. The duo does not give concerts in the traditional sense: their repertoire is liturgical music, and therefore it is prayer in both voice and song. The silence in the duo’s name (Vox Silenti - the voice of silence) refers not only to silence as the starting point for all music but to the silence of the heart - a space for listening, a prayer.

Vox Silentii’s singing technique is closely linked to the church in which they perform, which gives the listener a chance to listen to the overtones, which may be perceived as faint flutelike sounds among the tones of the melody, and to the individual ‘voice of the church’ as well. They perform mainly in Finland and Sweden, so this concert offers a unique chance to hear one of their rare performances in the UK in which they perform chants for the feast days of St Thomas Aquinas (1224/5–1274) from 14th-century manuscripts.

The chants of the feast days of St Thomas Aquinas are now seldom heard. In the concert Vox Silentii sings chants from both feast days: Dies Natalis (7 March) and the day of Translation (28 January). All together there are over 60 chants associated with these feasts; this concert will feature approximately a third of them. The text of these chants does not relate Aquinas’s developments in theology but rather they form a picture of the respect for the saint and his struggles, as well as his miracles and his sainthood. Musically the chants are strongly rooted in the Dominican tradition.

For further information about Vox Silentii, please see www.voxsilentii.fi. For further information about the ongoing project ‘Touching, Tasting, Hearing, Seeing, and Smelling: Sensory Experiences in the Feasts of St Thomas Aquinas’, please see ossagloriosa.org.

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A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Julia & Nigel Gant of 4and20 Blackbirds Baking Sweets & Desserts

Tuesday 05 July

Price: Free

University Square

10.00 - 17.00

Come entice your senses on University Square, which will feature a different food-related display each day of the Congress. Experience different types of medieval food in a range of cooking and/or handling demonstrations, giving visitors a chance to see, smell, touch, and taste the Middle Ages. Smell spices and learn how they changed the way people cooked, feast your eyes (and taste buds) on the sweet treats available to the elite, watch the making of bread from scratch with a travelling bread oven, and immerse your senses in the making of soups and stews over an open fire. Whenever you visit, the changing food display is sure to pique your interest and stimulate your senses!

On Tuesday, Julia and Nigel Gant, from 4and20 Blackbirds, will be baking sweets and desserts from the Middle Ages, including marchpane made from powdered almonds, pounded sugar, and rose water.

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Keynote Lecture: Cookbooks, Health Books, Drug Manuals: Culinary Recipes in Search of a Genre

Tuesday 05 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber

13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Melitta Weiss Adamson, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures, University of Western Ontario

Introduction: Paul Freedman, Department of History, Yale University

In medieval Europe cookbooks started appearing only towards the end of the period. With over fifty recipe-collections ranging in length from several to several hundred recipes, Germany boasts the richest cookbook tradition, with all the extant manuscripts dating from ca. 1350-1500. A recently discovered Durham recipe-collection from the 12th century predates the oldest German cookbook by some two hundred years and is proof that European culinary recipes were recorded much earlier than previously known. The collection of ten sauce recipes which claim Poitou as their place of origin is written in Latin and included in a codex of medical recipes. The talk will explore the early beginnings of European culinary writing in the context of medieval medicine by using Germany as an example. It will look at monastic medicine, such as the medical writings of the nun Hildegard von Bingen, and the pharmacopoeias and regimens of health associated with the newly established medical schools and those by physicians from Germany and elsewhere who studied there. These sources illustrate the important role medical literature played in the early transmission of culinary recipes when a proper genre was still lacking as well as in the genesis of the late medieval cookbook.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, firstserved basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Special Lecture: Exploring Medieval Texts in the Modern Age

Tuesday 05 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

13.00 - 14.00

Rhiannon M. Lawrence-Francis, Special Collection, Leeds University Library

Special Collections is developing online learning resources which combine high-quality digital images with informative text. This session will introduce the Medieval Illuminated Manuscripts Digital Resource, featuring high-resolution images of manuscripts from France, Italy, Germany and the Low Countries. Next, the session will explore the Universal Chronicle, a 15th-century manuscript nearly 18 metres long that recounts the history of the world from the Creation to the reign of King Louis XI of France. The Brotherton Ovid Digital Learning Resource investigates the history of a set of three incunabula filled with drawings and annotations. Finally, the session will outline current photographic research on the collection of manuscript fragments hidden in bindings from Ripon Cathedral Library.

Rhiannon Lawrence-Francis works in Special Collections at Leeds University Library as Collections and Engagement Manager with particular responsibility for rare books and maps.

The session will take place in The Sheppard Room, accessed via the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, where some of these items will be on display. Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres (4.3 miles) of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection, the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, the Archives of the Dean & Chapter of Ripon, the Roth Collection, and the Oriental Manuscript Collection.

The Reading Room of Special Collections is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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Pontefract Castle and All Saints Church

Tuesday 05 July

Price: £24.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Pontefract Castle may be the most important medieval fortified site in northern England. Situated at the base of the Pennines, troops garrisoned there could rush to assist marcher forces facing Scottish incursions on either side of that range. Its construction by Ilbert de Lacy, who had fought at the Battle of Hastings alongside William, began as an earth and timber fortress in the wake of the Norman Conquest during c. 1070-80. In the 12th century it was rebuilt and expanded into an impressive stone castle which lasted until the mid-17th century, when Oliver Cromwell insisted it be slighted due to the danger its strength represented to controlling the landscape after it had served as a stronghold for royalists during the Civil War.

Though a magnificent royal castle from 1399 onwards, Pomfret Castle - as it was known as in Tudor times - has a dark history. It is the place where, Katherine Howard, the 5th Wife of Henry VIII, began the affair that would cost her life, and its 11th-century cellars held several notable prisoners, including the deposed Richard II - whose exact circumstances of death at Pontefract Castle remain unknown - James I of Scotland, and the captured Charles Duc d'Orleans from the battle of Agincourt in 1415. Several executions of nobles also took place here and prisoners’ carvings in the walls are still visible to this day. Its grim reputation was immortalised in Shakespeare’s Richard III, ‘O Pomfret, Pomfret! O thou bloody prison!’.

When the castle finally fell to Parliamentarians following a siege in 1648, the mayor of Pontefract petitioned for the castle to be destroyed to prevent further conflict in the area. The visit to the castle ruins will include a tour of the ‘dungeon,’ the traditional spot of the execution of Richard II, and a view of the site where Thomas of Lancaster was executed for treason against Edward II.

All Saints Church in Pontefract also saw its fair share of conflict. Built in 1300, only few parts of the original structure remain. During the Civil War over 60 cannon balls hit the church, one even lodging in a wall to be discovered in April 1999. Fortunately, its stunning double helix staircase was left intact and access was restored in the 1960s. It is one of three such medieval staircases still extant.

The excursion will be guided by Professor Kelly DeVries of Loyola College in Maryland and Michael Livingston of The Citadel in South Carolina.

Pontefract Castle is managed by Wakefield Council. For more information about All Saints Church, visit www.allsaintspontefract.co.uk

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'Swich a Feeste and Revel Make': A Medieval Feast

Tuesday 05 July

Price: £45.00

Entertainment: Daughters of Elvin

Great Hall

18.30 - 21.00

In honour of the special thematic strand for IMC 2016, Great Food at Leeds is proud to present its own version of a medieval feast with a modern twist, served in the grand setting of the Great Hall, a grade II listed Gothic revival building. The menu has been devised by Executive Chef Marc Mottershead, taking his inspiration from the 14th-century recipe collection, The Forme of Cury. Written in Middle English, the authors announce themselves as the ‘chief Master Cooks of King Richard II’, who was at the centre of a royal court renowned for its love of luxury and fine dining.

The provisional menu for this three-course meal includes:

  • Caboches in Potage - served with mixed grain bread Tart de Brye
  • Roasted Meats - served with verde sawse and sawse camelyne
  • Ravioles
  • Grene Pesen
  • Benes Yfryed
  • Salat
  • Strawberye and Chireyse - served with gingerbread
  • Hippocras - served with comfits

Entertainment in the form of music and dancing will also be provided by the medieval ensemble Daughters of Elvin. Bringing together evocative visuals and marrying them to carefully researched music, Daughters of Elvin enchant their audience by arranging monophonic melodies into compositions incorporating early instruments. Joining the group will be a dramatically costumed dancer, moving freely to music to create powerful displays of colour and movement.

Vegetarian options will be available, but the nature of the cuisine and the style of serving rules out catering for most other dietary requirements. Please contact the IMC if you have any queries about the menu or dietary requirements.

Further details about the feast are available on pp. 280-81 in the programme

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Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: Manuscript Edges, Marginal Time - Why Medieval Matters (Language: English)

Tuesday 05 July

Price: Free

Michael Sadler Building: Rupert Beckett Theatre

19.00 - 20.00

Speaker: Elaine Treharne, Department of English, Stanford University

Introduction: Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol

Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America

In an Early English manuscript, a later marginal addition in French that is unedited and untranslated turns out to be potentially the earliest avian verse fable in a vernacular of medieval England. The poem is quite likely to be written by a woman at an institution that took ownership of the manuscript perhaps fifty or more years after its production.

This one example of text, like all instances of interventions by contemporary and later manuscript perusers, reminds us of the centrality of the marginal, the fundamental significance of that which exists on the periphery. Here, a poem - elsewhere a note, a name, a sequence of ink dots - signifies not the insignificant; rather, the space around the manuscript’s initial contents becomes a site of discovery. The biggest discovery, though, as this talk will show, is what medieval books can teach modern scholarship about the nature of its own categories, hierarchies, chronologies, biases, and myopia. This lecture will demonstrate that a persistent fixation on the centre, the original, the canonical, the literary period, and the new, frequently misses the mark, revealing only a partial story, despite the fuller evidence available to us from our extant textual objects.

About the Medieval Academy of America:
The Medieval Academy is pleased once again to host the Annual Medieval Academy Lecture, an opportunity for the Academy to showcase some of the important work being done by scholars in North America. We hope you will join us for a reception immediately following the lecture, where members of the Medieval Academy staff will be available to answer questions about the Academy and its work. For more information about the Academy, please see www.medievalacademy.org. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the Medieval Academy after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, firstserved basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Feast and Folly in Arthurian Epic: Hartmann von Aue's Iwein

Tuesday 05 July

Price:£12.50

Performed and Staged by: The Bayreuth Medieval Drama Group

Directed by: Silvan Wagner

Michael Sadler Building: Banham Theatre

20.30 - 22.00

Hartmann von Aue is often considered the founder of Arthurian legend in German literature, composing courtly narratives adapted from the writings of Chrétien de Troyes. Iwein, a Middle High German romance freely translated from Yvain, the Knight of the Lion, tells the story of a knight who wins and loses the love of a lady and can only regain his love and his identity with the help of a lion and the machinations of his wife’s clever companion. Striking scenes from Iwein appear in frescoes in the castle of Rodenegg, commissioned by a noble family in southern Tyrol in the 13th century. These frescoes are something of a curiosity, having no parallel in the French sources or other Arthurian epics.

Life-sized reproductions of these astonishing paintings serve as a backdrop to a very special performance: the Bayreuth Medieval Drama Group - all of whom are specialists in performing medieval German literature - bring the beginning of Hartmann’s most fascinating romance back to life. In this historically-informed multimedia performance, they will read, declaim, sing, and play the first 1000 lines of Middle High German verses of the courtly romance (with English summaries), with the beautiful frescoes playing a distinct part.

Hartmann’s masterpiece opens to show the Arthurian court lost in sloth: at the great feast of Whitsuntide the knights are playing, the king and his queen are sleeping, and the only tale of adventure is a crude and ignominious geste of a castle of love, a wild man, and a charmed fountain, which happened to Kalogrenant ten years ago. No one could imagine that this peculiar and foolish narration will be the starting point of Iwein’s own fabulous adventures. One of the listeners to Kalogrenant’s tale of defeat, he resolves to take matters into his own hands.

Silvan Wagner, who has a PhD in medieval German literature from the University of Bayreuth, has gained a rich experience as a professional musician directing and producing multimedia dramas featuring the texts and illustrations of medieval love poetry and courtly epics. His productions bring together the musical principles of historically informed performance with acting medieval narrative literature.

The International Medieval Congress and the Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft are proud to sponsor this unique musical event, creating a totally new means of bringing medieval literature to life.

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A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Julia & Nigel Gant of 4and20 Blackbirds Making Bread & Butter

Wednesday 06 July

Price: Free

University Square

10.00 - 17.00

Come entice your senses on University Square, which will feature a different food-related display each day of the Congress. Experience different types of medieval food in a range of cooking and/or handling demonstrations, giving visitors a chance to see, smell, touch, and taste the Middle Ages. Smell spices and learn how they changed the way people cooked, feast your eyes (and taste buds) on the sweet treats available to the elite, watch the making of bread from scratch with a travelling bread oven, and immerse your senses in the making of soups and stews over an open fire. Whenever you visit, the changing food display is sure to pique your interest and stimulate your senses!

Julia and Nigel are back on Wednesday to demonstrate traditional butter-churning techniques and bread-making in their travelling bread ovens, small samples will be available from two different types of rolls: maslin and manchet both of which will be baked on site.

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Special Lecture: While Shepherds Ate

Wednesday 06 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures Gallery

13.00 - 14.00

Eileen White, Leeds Symposium on Food History & Traditions

Introduction: Rhiannon M. Lawrence-Francis, Special Collection, Leeds University Library

The shepherds in the medieval biblical plays from Chester and Wakefield (Towneley) are depicted sharing a supper before being interrupted by an angel who tells them of the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. The two groups describe contrasting menus. Using the cookery book collection from the Leeds University Library’s Special Collections, this session will examine what the shepherds ate, and the menus to which they refer. Links will be made to traditional food of the north of England.

Eileen White is a food historian with a keen interest in how these books can be a source for historical research.

The session will take place in The Sheppard Room, accessed via the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, where some of these items will be on display. Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres (4.3 miles) of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection, the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, the Archives of the Dean & Chapter of Ripon, the Roth Collection, and the Oriental Manuscript Collection.

The Reading Room of Special Collections is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details can be found at http://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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Kirkstall Abbey

Wednesday 06 July

Price: £16.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 17.00

One of the best-preserved examples of a medieval Cistercian monastery in England can be seen within two miles of the International Medieval Congress. A daughter-house of Fountains, Kirkstall Abbey is remarkable for both the quality and extent of its preservation. Large parts of the church, chapter house, cloister, south range, and abbot's lodging survive up to roof height. Complementing these impressive standing remains is the guest house, a rare survival in monastic precincts, which has been excavated extensively so that its structural developments are understood in great depth.

Despite its extensive architectural and archaeological remains, Kirkstall has received little scholarly attention, and the importance its material culture holds for understanding medieval religious life has consequently been neglected. However, the guesthouse has recently been the focus of extensive archaeological and historical enquiry and a subsequent AHRC-funded cultural engagement project has ensured that the findings of this research will be made freely available. This work has highlighted the importance of the guesthouse for the social life of the abbey, revealing how the monastic community provided hospitality to guests and entertained them within the precinct.

New information concerning finds from the guesthouse, such as dress accessories, provides greater clarity regarding the identity of guests and what they did while at the abbey; the animal bones, meanwhile, provide an indication of the food eaten by guests and enable comparison with monastic fare. As a result, the guesthouse can now be set in the wider context of Kirkstall’s structures, which have been the subject of a number of modern restorations. This permits a more holistic appreciation of the life in the abbey during the Middle Ages.

The tour provides an overview of the history of the abbey from its establishment in 1152, and gives particular attention to the guesthouse and its importance in monastic life. This excursion will be led by Katherine Baxter, Curator of Archaeology at Leeds Museums & Galleries, Leeds City Council.

For more information about Kirkstall Abbey, go to www.leeds.gov.uk/kirkstallabbey

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'First Thing on the Table': A Sampling of Traditional Cheeses from Northern England

Wednesday 06 July

Price: £15.00

Introduced by: Andy Swincoe

Social Sciences Building: Room 10.10

18.30 - 19.30

Yorkshire has a long history of cheese-making: following the Norman invasion in 1066, many French Cistercian monks brought over cheese-making techniques to the hills and river-valleys of the Yorkshire Dales; these techniques were used to make firm, crumbly cheeses throughout the region. After the dissolution of the monasteries, Yorkshire farms took over the production of cheese, where the tradition still continues to present day.

Join Andy Swinscoe from the Courtyard Dairy in Settle, Yorkshire, to sample eight traditionallymade cheeses from the North of England. The tasting will be accompanied by an informal talk about the history of cheese-making and dairying in medieval to early modern northern England, as well as developments in modern-day practices.

Andy Swinscoe studied Culinary Arts and Hospitality at Sheffield Hallam University, before working at Paxton and Whitfield - Britain’s oldest cheesemonger - where he hand-delivered cheese to Buckingham Palace. Receiving an award in Cheese Maturing from the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust enabled Andy to indulge his passion for cheese and complete an apprenticeship in the intricate art of affinage (ageing cheese) in France with Hervé Mons. Andy’s own specialist cheese shop and refiner, the Courtyard Dairy, opened in 2012 with the ethos to support the few remaining independent farmhouse cheese-makers producing authentic farmhouse British cheese.

This event can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended. All cheeses contain rennet (not suitable for vegetarians) and most are unpasteurised. Please contact the IMC if you have any questions regarding dietary requirements.

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Mankind

Wednesday 06 July

Price: Free

Performed by: Poculi Ludique Societas (PLS)

Directed by: Matthew Sergi And Ara Glenn-Johanson

Beechgrove Plaza

19.00 - 20.30

Mankind, who represents the human race, is tempted into sin by Mischief, New Guise, Nowadays, and Nought, who further enlist the demon Titivillus to help them in their task. Fallen into depravity, Mankind must, with the help of Mercy, seek redemption. But is it too late?

Poculi Ludique Societas (PLS), an acclaimed theatre company affiliated with the University of Toronto, is proud to present a site-specific professional production of the raucous 15th-century morality play Mankind, co-directed by Matthew Sergi and Ara Glenn-Johanson, and made possible by generous support from the Connaught Fund's New Researcher Award. In a remount of the exciting show that they brought to the Cloisters Museum and to the University of Toronto Festival of Early Drama last year, this cast of six women will playfully reframe the anti-feminist themes in the text, accompanying their antics with authentic medieval music and Second City-trained improvisation.

For over fifty years, PLS has presented live productions of early plays, drawn from the beginnings of European drama. Rather than ‘taking liberties’ with these texts, our current production directors Matthew Sergi and Ara Glenn-Johanson aim to restore liberties to premodern English plays, undermining some of the restrictive ideas of form, content, and etiquette that characterize modern theatrical conventions, in order to challenge - and amuse - postmodern audiences. Thanks to generous support from the Connaught Fund's New Researcher Award, Sergi and Glenn-Johanson are now taking their cast on a tour of the UK, appearing at various universities and culminating in a weekend of Birmingham shows in association with Stan's Cafe. PLS is an independent non-profit theatre company affiliated with the University of Toronto's Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies, and associated with its Centre for Medieval Studies and Records of Early English Drama.

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Durham Cathedral

Thursday 07 July

Price: £39.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Durham Cathedral, begun in 1093, has always dominated its city and demonstrated the power of its ruling prince-bishops. It was also a priory under the care of Benedictine monks and the site of the main pilgrimage of the North, to visit the shrine of St Cuthbert, during the medieval period. More recently, readers of the Guardian newspaper voted Durham Cathedral to be ‘Britain’s best building’ in 2011.

The Cathedral is of breath-taking size and is one of the most significant church buildings of the Romanesque period, combining new approaches to architecture and sculpture with reflections on the Anglo-Saxon past. This excursion will provide the chance to explore the architecture, discussing its innovative high vaults, its decorative and architectural use of sculpture, and the layout of its chapels. The excursion will also, by using information from the documentary record, recreate some of the experience of the building for the monks and the pious laity in the late medieval period.

The trip will include a self-guided visit to the recently opened Durham Cathedral Open Treasure exhibition. As well as enabling visitors to see two of the major buildings of the monastic complex, the great dormitory and kitchen, participants will also have access to the principal treasures of the cathedral’s collections. When fully opened, items in this exhibition will include the single most important assemblage of early medieval stone sculpture in England, leading examples of Romanesque manuscript illumination and metalwork, and, above all, the famous relics of St Cuthbert, including his gold and garnet pectoral cross, late 7th-century carved wooden reliquary coffin, and spectacular early 10th-century embroidered vestments.

The guide for the cathedral will be Eric Cambridge, an independent scholar from Durham, and Charlie Rozier from the Department of History at Durham University. The visit to the exhibition will be self-guiding, but participants will have a chance to take part in a question and answer session with guides Eric and Charlie, both of whom are active in researching the development of St Cuthbert’s cult and community in medieval Durham. A packed lunch will be included.

For more information about Durham Cathedral, go to www.durhamcathedral.co.uk

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A Feast for All Senses: Food from History Display - Caroline Yeldham Cooking Soups & Stews

Thursday 07 July

Price: Free

University Square

10.00 - 17.00

Come entice your senses on University Square, which will feature a different food-related display each day of the Congress. Experience different types of medieval food in a range of cooking and/or handling demonstrations, giving visitors a chance to see, smell, touch, and taste the Middle Ages. Smell spices and learn how they changed the way people cooked, feast your eyes (and taste buds) on the sweet treats available to the elite, watch the making of bread from scratch with a travelling bread oven, and immerse your senses in the making of soups and stews over an open fire. Whenever you visit, the changing food display is sure to pique your interest and stimulate your senses!

On Thursday, Caroline Yeldham will be demonstrating medieval food methods by cooking traditional medieval dishes, such as egredouce, cumminee, and herbolat over charcoal. Visitors will be able to sample food throughout the week and are encouraged to ask questions, enquire about traditional cooking methods, and the equipment used in the demonstrations.

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Making Leeds Medieval

Thursday 07 July

Price: Free

Leeds University Uninion, University Square, and the Marquee

10.30 - 18.00

As the IMC 2016 draws to a close, join us in and around University Square for a range of activities, including a market featuring local produce and historical craft demonstrations. The Medieval Craft Fair will once again be extended to include a second day of trading during ‘Making Leeds Medieval’. Come and browse a range of hand-crafted items including handbound books, historically-inspired woodwork, haberdashery, historic beads, and jewellery.

The Historical and Archaeological Societies Fair will be scheduled to coincide with ‘Making Leeds Medieval’, providing a unique opportunity to find out more about some of the many independent groups within the UK actively involved in preserving local and national history.

As last year, ‘Making Leeds Medieval’ will also feature live entertainment including music, combat displays, falcons, and hawks. The King Edward’s Living History Group will also join us with a mixture of hands-on activities, demonstrations, and displays.

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Great Halls of York: Merchant Adventurers’, Merchant Taylors’, and Barley Halls

Thursday 07 July

Price: £25.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.30

This excursion will visit some of the finest surviving medieval civic and domestic architecture in York, taking in the two guild halls belonging to the Merchant Adventurers and the Merchant Taylors’, two guilds that have remained in continuous existence since the medieval period, and the surviving buildings are a testament to their power and influence. The tour will also visit Barley Hall, a 14th-century town house that formerly belonged to Nostell Priory.

A guild (or ‘gild’) was an association of merchants or craftsmen. These organisations were formed to provide mutual assistance for but also to protect the interests of their members. Yet guilds also served other purposes, such as caring for the poor and sick, as well as participating in civic projects, such as the performance of the Corpus Christi Pageants. Guilds demonstrated their wealth and power by constructing magnificent buildings, which offered a space for members to conduct business, socialise, and dine together, as well as almshouses and chapels to fulfil more spiritual obligations.

The city of York has one of the finest surviving collections of guildhalls in the United Kingdom. Merchant Adventurers' Hall, built in c. 1356, is one of the country’s oldest surviving examples of a guild hall in Britain. Within its semi-timbered walls, the great hall, undercroft (used as an almshouse), and chapel can still be seen. The Merchant Taylors' Hall, built in c. 1415, also contains a magnificent great hall of ambitious width and with exposed oak roof timbers. In addition to visiting the surviving guild buildings and learning about their history, this excursion will additionally reveal how the Halls were set for feasting.

The Tour will also include a visit to Barley Hall. This medieval house from 1360 was the York town house of Nostell Priory near Wakefield. As prebendary canons of York Minster, it served as a hostel for priors travelling to the city on business, but was later also leased out to private tenants such as William Snawsell, Lord Mayor of York. Nostell Priory owned this property until 1540, when it was confiscated by the crown as part of Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries. The lodgings were turned into housing and tradesmen’s workshops and eventually fell into disrepair. After investigating the site, the York Archaeological Trust purchased the site in 1987 and have since restored it to its medieval splendour including the former great hall and pantry.

This excursion will be led by Kate Giles of the Department of Archaeology, University of York, one of the leading scholars on medieval public buildings.

For more information on Merchant Adventurers' Hall, visit www.theyorkcompany.co.uk. Further Merchant Taylors' Hall details are available at www.merchant-taylors-york.org. www.barleyhall.co.uk features further details of Barley Hall.

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'Let The Spinning Wheel Turn': A Spinning Workshop

Thursday 07 July

Ticket Price: £25.00

Directed by: Ruth Gilbert

Social Sciences Building: Room 10.10

13.30 - 17.30

From good queens fulfilling household duties to witches casting spells with spindle and distaff, the craft of spinning wool appeals to the modern imagination as a metaphor for both virtue and malice. Yet the work of carding and spinning wool was an essential part of medieval society, playing a vital role in the household economy, textile production, displays of wealth and power, and the market trade. The spinning wheel slowly took over from the distaff in the late medieval period, in practice and as a cultural symbol of the household.

This workshop will provide a practical exploration of the ‘new technology’ of the 13th century. Participants will card wool and spin on the spindle wheel (‘great wheel’) to make yarn suitable for broadcloth. Previous experience is not necessary as much of what will be taught is unlike modern techniques. The session will also include discussion of different wool types and medieval images of carders and spinners. In addition to their yarn, participants will receive an information sheet.

Ruth Gilbert has been a hand weaver for nearly 40 years, teaching people to spin all of her working life. Early in her career, she became involved in historical re-enactment and began to explore textile history, researching appropriate spinning and knitting techniques and cloth types as well as weaving replica cloths. She has also worked as a costumed historical interpreter at Kentwell Hall for many years. In 2004, she was awarded an MA in the History of Textiles and Dress at Winchester School of Art (University of Southampton), after which she completed an MPhil at the Textile Conservation Centre (University of Southampton). In her thesis, The King’s Vest and the Seaman’s Gansey: Continuity and Diversity of Construction in Hand Knitted Body Garments in North Western Europe Since 1550, she focuses upon how skills were learned, remembered and taught, and how evidence for this can be deduced from surviving textiles. She is currently working on a history of knitting.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended. This session requires the use of wool and may be unsuitable for those who are allergic to lanolin. Although carders will be provided if necessary, please bring your own if you have them.

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Foraging in the Neighbourhood: A Walking Tour of the University of Leeds Campus

Thursday 07 July

Price: £7.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 16.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 17.00

Throughout history, humans have relied on foraging to sustain life. From small huntergatherer societies to vast moving armies, foraging served as a vital means of providing nourishment from the edible fruits, vegetables, and plants in the local surroundings. Although this technique has largely been lost in the 20th and 21st centuries with the advent of supermarkets, small corner shops, and even local farmers’ markets, throughout the medieval period, foraging was an essential tool for locating food within one’s reach and supplementing one’s diet.

Join Mina Said-Allsopp as she guides you through a sensory experience right on the main campus of the University of Leeds and the surrounding vicinity. Be surprised by the amount of organic food situated within a short walk of the iconic Parkinson Building. Participants will be taken on an hour-long foraging session, learning about medicinal herbs, edible mushrooms, and gaining knowledge of local delicacies that you might encounter in daily life but otherwise pass by.

Mina Said-Allsopp started running foraging walks and courses in 2007, while completing a PhD at the University of Leeds. Since then, she has taught hundreds of people from all over the country to forage, appearing in the Leeds Guide, The Big Issue in the North, The Guardian, and North Leeds Life. TV and radio appearances include BBC Radio Leeds, BBC Radio Gloucester, BBC Look North and ‘The Edible Garden’ with Alys Fowler on BBC 2. Msitu, Mina’s line of natural food and beauty products, which are made from foraged ingredients, will be available for purchase at the Craft Fair and Making Leeds Medieval, on Wednesday and Thursday of the Congress.

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Digital Media and Medieval Studies: How to Create A Professional and Financially Sustainable Future for Your Research Online – A Workshop

Friday 08 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: Medievalists.net

Parkinson Building: Room B.09

09.00 - 14.00

Are you interested in sharing your knowledge of the Middle Ages with the online world? Would you like to build your audience and perhaps earn some income by writing about medieval topics? This workshop will help you learn about finding your own medieval niche on the World Wide Web and the ways people earn revenues through this digital media.

The first half of the workshop will examine how to write effectively for websites, focusing on which topics and what kinds of posts will generate strong audience engagement. We will also look at what search engine optimization (SEO) is and how to market your website using social media and email.

The second part of the workshop will turn to ways of earning revenues from your online properties, starting with running advertisements and making use of affiliate marketing. Then, we will look at how one can sell products through their website, create ebooks, and the possibility of using your online profile to teach courses. Finally, we will talk about how one can earn money through Youtubing and podcasting.

This workshop will be very beneficial to anyone who wants to increase the number of readers on their websites, use their medieval studies knowledge to earn some income, or are planning to have a career in digital media. It will be led by members of Medievalists.net, one of the leading online resources in the field of medieval studies, who have been creating and running websites for over seven years.

Since 2008, Medievalists.net has billed itself as the media site for the Middle Ages, offering news, articles, and videos about medieval studies. It is one of the largest online resources about the Middle Ages, receiving over three-quarters of a million page views per month and with a large social media following of over 42,000 followers on Twitter alone.

Peter Konieczny was a librarian at the University of Toronto before becoming part-owner of Medievalists.net. He has been developing websites for 15 years and is based in Toronto. Sandra Alvarez's background is in human resources and social media, while being a partner at Medievalists.net for over seven years. A former Toronto native, Sandra moved to London in 2013 to become Medievalists.net's European Correspondent, reporting on medieval events, historical sites, and academic conferences. Peter and Sandra have extensive experience in web design, blogging, social media, and the use of digital media to support the dissemination of scholarship to wide-ranging audiences.

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Government, Law, Land, and Ceremony: Medieval Records at the National Archives - A Workshop

Friday 08 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: The National Archives, Kew

Parkinson Building: Room B.09

09.30 - 13.00

For all medievalists the ability to locate, read, and understand archival sources is fundamental to their research whatever their discipline and stage in their career. The National Archives of the United Kingdom (TNA) holds one of the world’s largest and most important collections of medieval records. The vast archive of English royal government informs almost every aspect of medieval life from the royal court to the peasantry, land ownership and tenure, the law, warfare and diplomacy, trade and manufacture, transport, credit and debt, death and memory, material culture, literature, art and music. However, finding, using, and interpreting the rich diversity of material is not always entirely straightforward and its potential for a wide range of research uses often unclear. This workshop will offer an introduction to TNA, show you how to begin your research into its collections, and access research support. A course-pack with facsimiles of original documents will be used to illustrate the range of disciplines and topics TNA records can inform and illuminate. Short, themed sessions will also introduce attendees to the Mechanics of Medieval Government, Law and Justice, Land and Landholders, and Royal Household and Material Culture (following on from last year’s sessions on Church and Religion and Warfare and Diplomacy).

This workshop is aimed at all medievalists, from masters students through to experienced academics in any discipline, who wish to discover more about the rich archive collections at TNA and how they might use them in their research. There are no pre-requisites for attending the workshop, although a basic knowledge of Latin is recommended.

Jessica Nelson is Head of Medieval, Early Modern, Legal, and Maps and Photographs (MEMLAMP) at The National Archives and specialises in queenship and government in the 12th and 13th centuries in England and Scotland. Sean Cunningham is a Principal Records Specialist Manager, Medieval & Early Modern, and specialises in 15th- and 16thcentury records of English royal government. Laura Tompkins is a Medieval Records Specialist whose research has focussed on government, parliament, and household in the late Middle Ages. Paul Dryburgh is a Medieval Records Specialist with interests in government, politics, and warfare in the British Isles in the 13th and 14th centuries.

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Terms and Conditions

Events

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel events due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Excursions

We recommend that you reserve your place on the excursions by registering as early as possible, as seats on the coach will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Please make a note of how participation in the excursions will affect your meal requirements, and note also the time of departure from and return to the University of Leeds in relation to other commitments, and book accordingly. Sensible footwear is recommended, as the wearing of high-heeled shoes is impractical at most sites, and prohibited at some. Most excursions will involve a significant amount of walking and/or standing, please contact the IMC if you have any questions or concerns about a particular excursion. It would also be advisable to bring raincoats. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We ask that those participating in excursions arrive at the steps of the Parkinson Building 15 minutes before the excursion is due to leave. A member of staff will be present in this area to provide information.

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel excursions due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Prices for the excursions include coach transport, entrance fees and donations to the sites, fees for the guides, staffing, and administration costs. Meals are not included in the price unless otherwise indicated.

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