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2002/03 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

ARTF5690
Ideals and Aesthetics: Nineteenth Century Architectural Theory and Practice
20 credits

Taught Semester 2,

Year running 2002/03

Pre-requisites None

Co-requisites None

This module is available as an elective

Objectives
On completion of this module, students should: have a substantial understanding of some of the significant theories and practices of design between 1800 and 1910; have a good knowledge of objects and architecture and be able to discuss their visual aspects; have undertaken critical study of the social and ideological formation of theories and the disputes to which they gave rise; understand the arts and crafts movement as an attempt to address social problems and as an alternative to, or a part of, notions of consumerism, industrialisation and the market.

Syllabus
This module considers the revolutionary nature of nineteenth century architectural design in Britain, expressed in the planning, construction and appearance of buildings and the social and political ideals of the architects. It concentrates on domestic architecture but will also consider the interiors of the 'house beautiful' as a part of a consideration of the overall design schemes being offered. The work of designers, architects and theoreticians including Pugin, Ruskin, Morris, Webb, Burne-Jones, Voysey, Ashbee, Lutyens and Mackintosh form the basis of a discussion of developments made in design during this period. A consideration of the placing of such design practices in the newly industrialised, consumer-led market, will allow the students to consider the nature of design and consumerism in the nineteenth century. Contemporary philosophical thought and architectural theory will be used in order to examine the aims and objectives of the architects and there will also be a consideration of how we can use twentieth-century philosophical thought to analyse nineteenth-century practice.

Form of teaching
Seminars: 10 x 3 hours; Visit: 1 x 3 hours

Form of assessment
1 x 4000-6000 word essay

Undergraduate Module Catalogue | Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

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