Events and Excursions

The IMC will once again include a lively programme of events and excursions. Please click on the events below for further details. All events and excursions are open to IMC delegates and the general public. Delegates may book tickets in advance when registering for the IMC 2018. Read the terms and conditions

All IMC events and excursions are open to members of the public unless otherwise stated.

The Leeds University Union Medieval Society is hosting a range of medieval-themed events during the IMC in Leeds University Union, including the inaugural International Medieval Film Festival. For more details about the Society, their Events Programme and the Film Festival, view the Leeds University Union Medieval Society Programme of Events or visit the LUU Medieval Society webpage.

View a map of the Congress site

Sunday 01 July 2018

Excursion: Mount Grace Priory and Jervaulx Abbey

£38.50

Excursion: Stank Old Hall, New Hall, and Barn

£15.00

Excursion: Middleham Castles: The Wensleydale Domain Lord, Rebel Earl, and Plantagenet Prince

£26.00

'No gold glitters like that which is our own': Medieval Goldwork Embroidery Workshop

£32.50

'Draw they sword in right': A Combat Workshop

£15.00

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Strange Adventures and Otherworldly Journeys

FREE

Monday 02 July 2018

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Keynote Lectures: But What Are YOU Remembering For? / Do Words Remember?: The Etymologist versus the Vikings

FREE

Keynote Lecture: The Metaphors They Lived by: Verbal Imagery of Memory in the Middle Ages

FREE

The Casale Pilgrim: a Journey Into Jewish Visual Representations of the Holy Land

FREE

Excursion: John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

£23.50

Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Lights, Power, and the Moral Economy of Early Medieval Europe

FREE

Special Lecture: Black Legends, Bullying Queens, and the Wonders of Moorishland - How Spain Lives Its Medieval Past Today

CANCELLED

'To lerne the tretis of the astrelabie': Astrolabe Workshop

FREE

‘All thy best parts bound together’: Coptic Bookbinding Workshop

£28.50

Music from the Ritson Manuscript

£12.50

Leeds University Union Pub Quiz

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Tuesday 03 July 2018

Second-Hand and Antiquarian Bookfair

FREE

Medieval Highlights From Leeds University Library Special Collections

FREE

Keynote Lecture: Historical Present: Fake History, Material Culture, and Collective Misremembering

FREE

Excursion: Kirkstall Abbey

£17.50

International Medieval Film Festival: The Little Hours

(Organised by the LUU Medieval Society)

FREE

Art of the Sofer: Jewish Calligraphy Workshop

£7.50

New Voices Lecture: Transgender Lives in Byzantium

FREE

Detour to Paradise: Oswald von Wolkenstein and the Council of Constance (1414-1418)

£12.00

Wednesday 04 July 2018

Medieval Craft Fair

FREE

Medieval Highlights From Leeds University Library Special Collections

FREE

Keynote Lecture: I Can't Remember the Middle Ages

FREE

Excursion: York Minster

£24.00

Dead Sisters Do Tell Tales: A Theatrical Reading of Modern Devout Sister-Books

FREE

Remember Death: Johannes Kolross’s Spil von Fünfferley betrachtnussen zur Buß (Play of Five Tableaux about Repentance), 1532

FREE

Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: History and Visual Memory in the Library of King Charles V of France

FREE

Open Mic Night

FREE

Thursday 05 July 2018

Excursion: Southwell Minster and Town

£38.50

Making Leeds Medieval

FREE

Historical & Archaeological Societies Fair

FREE

Excursion: Conisbrough Castle

£24.50

Friday 06 July 2018

7 Ways a Medievalist Can Earn Income outside Academic

£7.50

Medieval Records and The National Archives: A Workshop

£7.50

'Of armed alabaster': Medieval Military Effigies of West Yorkshire - A Workshop

CANCELLED

Mount Grace Priory and Jervaulx Abbey

Sunday 01 July

Price: £38.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Even in Yorkshire, with its many surviving monastic sites, Mount Grace Priory and Jervaulx Abbey are both very special: significant for their setting, as well as for their physical remains.

Mount Grace Priory is the best preserved and most accessible of the nine English medieval Carthusian charterhouses, and one of the most intensively researched in Europe. 2018 will see the publication of that research. The last monastery to be established in Yorkshire before the suppression, it retains the well-preserved ruins of its church, the individual cells of its choir-monks and lay-brothers, and the guest houses and service ranges of the inner court. The site was substantially excavated between 1968 and 1992, providing exceptional evidence for the reconstruction of a single monk’s cell and its garden to demonstrate the setting of late medieval Carthusian life.

Jervaulx Abbey, in comparison, was a Cistercian monastery primarily of the late 12th-15th centuries, maintained as a semi-natural ruin in a post-medieval parkland landscape that still contains extensive evidence of the monastic precinct on which it is based. Its ruins are conserved as they were left by its early 19th-century excavators with fallen stones placed on the wall-tops close to where they were found. Because of this, the ruins are remarkably informative, showing the building of a revolutionary new church in the 1190s, the development of the cloister buildings throughout the second half of the 12th century, and their late medieval modification for the developing monastic life that is usually better documented than found in surviving buildings.

Though heavily ruined, sufficient evidence survives in the church to show it was the model for the eastern arms of both Fountains Abbey and Beverley Minster, and an increasing number of early 13th-century churches in eastern England.

This excursion will be led by Glyn Coppack (Archaeological and Historical Research), who was responsible for the development of conservation and research on both sites for English Heritage, and Stuart Harrison (Ryedale Archaeology Services). A packed lunch will be included.

For more information on the sites, visit the Mount Grace Priory and Jervaulx Abbey websites

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Stank Old Hall, New Hall, and Barn

Sunday 01 July

Price: £15.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 14.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 18.00

The Stank Old Hall, New Hall, and Barn site in South Leeds had constant occupation from prehistoric times, as witnessed by the Iron Age defensive earthworks visible on the hillside immediately behind the site, which were excavated just before the Second World War. Stank Old Hall (with prominent garderobe) was rebuilt in 1280 from an earlier hall to provide a royal hunting lodge attached to Rothwell Castle. It was originally surrounded by a quadrangle of guest halls, domestic buildings, and offices such as hawking mews, kennels, stables, as well as butchery and smoking lodges. After the sudden cessation of the royal use of the site after the Wars of the Roses, when Rothwell Castle itself had fallen, these offices were demolished so quickly that the flagged floor of one long hall - probably guest quarters - still exists crosswise under the floor of the large timbered barn that was built on the site. At this time the Old Hall was re-purposed into a more domestic building by adding another hall cornerwise onto one end to form a larger L-shaped hall, although the garderobe was retained. A local family, the De Beestons, held the site for several centuries, although it seems likely that a form of hunting park surrounding the site was revived briefly in the 16th century, utilising the long redundant earthworks and chases.

In the 17th century, when the site was owned by the Puritan Major Greathead, one bay of the barn was rebuilt to form a courthouse presided over by the Major himself. This became known locally - probably not without humour - as Major Greathead’s Chapel. Looking at the interior stonework, especially of the doorways and the external carvings, it appears to be repurposed stonework of a medieval chapel.

In 1847 disaster struck the site: an underground explosion known as the Beeston Mining Disaster demolished the end of New Hall and flattened a wattle and daub timber-framed wing that had been added in the 17th century. The owner of the site took out an advertisement in the Leeds Mercury stating that the disaster had revealed many pieces of carving and antiquity from the structure of the halls and invited local historians to come and barter for it. The cost to bring a horse and cart or carriage was two shillings, and thereafter the price of each item would be negotiated individually. Once the site had been rifled, Old Hall and New Hall were shored up, and the timber-frame structure of the barn, which had listed to one side, was straightened with the aid of a team of oxen.

Now owned by Leeds City Council, the site is sadly falling into dereliction, but it is supported by volunteers from the local community who have formed the Friends of Stank Hall and who are working to acquire the site for community housing, a community centre, and a small museum, together with a garden providing free vegetables for members of the local community. A programme of heritage activities and events is run each spring, summer, and autumn by the Friends, together with open days to let visitors access the inside of the barn and archaeological activities to clear finds from spoil heaps left from Leeds City Council’s work on the site. The Old and New Halls can only be viewed from the outside, but the barn, which is one of the oldest secular buildings in Leeds and Grade II* listed, will be open.

This excursion will be guided by members of the Friends of Stank Hall. This tour will involve a significant amount of walking over rough ground. Participants are advised to wear study walking shoes and comfortable clothing that they don’t mind getting dirty.

For more information go to the Friends of Stank Hall website

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Middleham Castles: The Wensleydale Domain Lord, Rebel Earl, and Plantagenet Prince

Sunday 01 July

Price: £26.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

This tour visits two castles on one site that at different times dominated this area of the Yorkshire landscape, overlooking the roads between the important towns of Richmond and Skipton. The earlier castle, ‘William’s Hill’, is the remnant of a Norman ringwork-and-bailey castle, built about 1086, and the later stone castle has connections with Richard III (r. 1483-1485), the last Plantagenet king of England. Both castles had their origins in land granted to the Norman lord, Alan Rufus (‘the Red’) of Brittany (a second cousin of William the Conqueror) who fought at Hastings in 1066. He helped stamp Norman authority on the area by leading the infamous ‘Harrying of the North’ during 1069-70, the savage suppression of a rebellion against the new Norman masters that led to the loss of over 150,000 lives. Alan was well rewarded for his efforts: it has been estimated that when he died in 1093 his fortune was worth over £107.5 billion (at 2017 prices).

During the 15th century, however, the stone castle became the property of the Neville family and, for a while, the property of Richard III. In 1462, Richard, the young Duke of Gloucester, was placed in the household of his cousin Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (‘the Kingmaker’) and was brought up at Middleham Castle for a short period of three years (1465-8), as well as at other Neville houses. Both Edward IV (1469) and Henry VI were held captive at the castle and, following Warwick’s death at the battle of Barnet in 1471, Edward IV gave Middleham to his brother, Richard, who had married Warwick’s daughter Anne Neville. Despite the short time he would have stayed here, it later became Richard’s principal seat in the North, and it was here, in about 1476, that his one legitimate son, Prince Edward of Middleham, was born, allegedly in the castle’s ‘Prince’s Tower’. Prince Edward’s wet-nurse was one Isabel Burgh (who was later rewarded by Richard with a generous annuity from the revenues of Middleham) and an Anne Idley was appointed ‘Mistress of the Nursery’. Her late husband, Peter Idley, had written a book entitled Instructions to His Son. In 1484 Edward died at the castle and possibly lies, buried still, in the local parish and collegiate church of St Mary and St Alkelda. The size and scale of Middleham castle shows that it was well able to cater for noble and royal households of upwards of 200.

This excursion will be led by Kelly DeVries (Professor of the Department of History, Loyola University, Maryland and Historical Consultant to the Royal Armouries) and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage (Curator of Armour and Edged Weapons, Royal Armouries, Leeds).

Although this excursion is self-contained, it will act as the perfect complement to this year’s IMC Post-Congress Tour, with its Ricardian connections. Sensible footwear is recommended, as there will be a significant amount of walking on uneven surfaces and climbing steep stone steps. It would also be advisable to bring raincoats and sunblock.

Find out more about Middleham Castle on its website

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'No gold glitters like that which is our own': Medieval Goldwork Embroidery Workshop

Sunday 01 July

Price: £32.50

Directed by: Tanya Bentham

University House: De Grey Room

11.00-17.00

From the earliest times, embroidering with gold thread has been a popular way to decorate items and display wealth and prestige across Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. Among the oldest surviving examples of English goldwork are the fragments of the stole and maniple of St Cuthbert, which were found in his coffin and are now on display in Durham Cathedral. Many of the later surviving examples of goldwork are various forms of ecclesiastical embroidery. In the 13th and 14th centuries, English luxury embroidery, sometimes called ‘Opus Anglicanum’ (English work), enjoyed an international reputation and was imported across Europe. Recently, Opus Anglicanum was the subject of an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

This workshop provides a rare opportunity to learn the goldwork embroidery techniques used throughout the medieval period. Participants will learn the basic stitches of goldwork embroidery – surface and underside couching - as well as how to incorporate pearls into their designs. The workshop fee includes all materials. Each participant will produce a compact lozenge-shaped piece that can be converted into a pendant or a key fob.

Tanya Bentham has been a re-enactor for more than 30 years, working for the last 20 as a professional living historian. Her main focus has always been on textiles, especially embroidery, but also making detours into costume, natural dyeing, weaving, millinery, and silversmithing. She has delivered workshops for numerous museums, schools, and community organisations throughout Yorkshire.

The workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended. Lunch is not included.

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'Draw thy sword in right': A Combat Workshop

Sunday 01 July

Price: £15.00

Directed by: Dean Davidson and Stuart Ivinson, Kunst Des Fechtens (KDF) International

Leeds University Union: Riley Smith Hall

14.00-16.30

Have you ever had a desire to learn how to fight like our historical forbears or study the highly effective fighting style that was taught throughout the medieval period? This year Kunst des Fechtens (KDF) International brings a workshop on the use of medieval longswords to the Congress participants.

KDF workshops bring a dynamic approach to training, with a martial application of this historical art through practical drills combined with interpretations from historical treatises. Our professional and experienced instructors will be on hand to provide tuition in this noble fighting style.

KDF International is an association of like-minded clubs from across Europe, whose aim is to promote the study, development, and practice of the martial arts tradition of medieval and renaissance Germany, in particular the work of the Master Johannes Liechtenauer. These martial arts have been preserved in numerous treatises and have been unearthed, transcribed, translated, and interpreted into a modern understanding of a subtle, dynamic, and effective martial arts system that looks at the use of a number of weapons and unarmed combat of the time. Founded in 2006, KDF was born from a desire to focus attention on Liechtenauer's works as well as bringing a dynamic approach to training, adding the use of protection as well as free play exercises and bouts to drill and practice as a part of trying to triangulate a truth within their interpretations.

Dean has over 20 years’ experience in martial arts and training in historical weapons. He is the KDF International Senior Instructor and European Historical Combat Guild Chapter Master at the Royal Armouries, Leeds. He is an active member of the Society for Combat Archaeology, an international organisation committed to the promulgation of systematic knowledge related to combat and warfare in the past. Dean is passionate about sharing knowledge on this subject and regularly presents at renowned international conferences and seminars, providing a unique insight in to the arms and armour used throughout medieval warfare. He is also a founding member of the Towton Battlefield Frei Compagnie and 3 Swords, a prestigious medieval historical and armed combat interpretation group. Dean holds a Masters in Health Informatics from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Leeds and is a member of the Leeds University Medieval Society.

Stuart Ivinson has been involved with historical combat for 16 years, joining the European Historical Combat Guild in 2000 and KDF upon its inception in 2006. He is currently an Assistant Instructor at the Leeds Chapter of both organisations. Stuart is also a member of the Society for Combat Archaeology and a founder member of both the Towton Battlefield Society Frei Compagnie and 3 Swords. He has made presentations regarding the display arms and armour for organisations such as the National Archives at Kew, English Heritage, and numerous British museums. Stuart has an MA in Librarianship, an MA in Medieval History, and a P.Dip in Heritage Management. When he is not being Dean’s sidekick, he is the Librarian at the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds.

All weapons are provided by KDF and attendees are asked to arrive wearing indoor training shoes and appropriate and comfortable gym training gear that will allow freedom of movement (i.e. t-shirt and tracksuit bottoms). Please make the instructors aware of any prior medical conditions.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Strange Adventures and Otherworldly Journeys

Sunday 01 July

Price: Free

Performed by: Matthew Bellwood

Leeds University Union: Room 6 - Roundhay

19.30 - 21.00

Master storyteller Matthew Bellwood brings to life Norse sagas, Celtic legends, and European folk stories in this collection of long-remembered tales from the Middle Ages. Enter into realms where gods battle frost giants, kings hide unexpected secrets, little girls fight wicked witches, and husbands reach out from other worlds to reclaim lost brides.

Matthew Bellwood is a Leeds-based writer and storyteller. His background is in devised theatre, and he has performed at drama festivals in Canada, Germany, and New Zealand, as well as throughout the UK. He currently runs Moveable Feast Productions, a touring Theatre in Education company, for which he has written and produced a wide range of shows and workshops for young people. He also works regularly with A Quiet Word, who create site-specific theatre work in unusual places.

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Keynote Lectures: But What Are YOU Remembering For? / Do Words Remember?: The Etymologist versus the Vikings

Monday 02 July

Price: Free

Great Hall

9.00 - 10.30

Speakers: Mary J. Carruthers, Department of English, New York University and Richard Dance, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge

Introduction: Lucie Doležalová, Institute of Greek & Latin Studies, Univerzita Karlova, Praha and Jan Čermák, Department of English, Univerzita Karlova, Praha

But What Are YOU Remembering For?
This lecture considers the importance of motive in what is now loosely called ‘remembering’ - as though it were a single, simple phenomenon. Though we now sharply distinguish ‘memory’ from ‘remembering’, the Middle Ages knew only one term, for medieval ‘vis memorativa’ and ‘vis reminiscentia’ are synonyms. Memoria in the scholastic and monastic traditions, though compatible, are quite different in their goals and definitions - I will explore some of these. My lecture touches on the nature of ‘rote’ and how it is distinct from ‘remembering’; the importance of ‘forgetting’; and the differences of ‘social memory’, ‘memory of God’, and some medieval accounts of Mind.

Do Words Remember?: The Etymologist versus the Vikings
English words have some extraordinary stories to tell. The history of English in the medieval period is famously colourful, reflecting centuries of complex interactions between the many languages spoken and written in and around Britain - but it is not always as easy as one might expect to discover the effects of these meetings. In particular, many hundreds of items in the medieval English lexicon have been explained as showing the influence of the early Scandinavian languages. These words are potentially invaluable witnesses to an intense period of Anglo-Scandinavian contact in the Viking Age, but getting them to ‘remember’ those encounters can be uniquely challenging. By presenting a range of examples from medieval English, including some words for acts of memory and intention, this lecture will explore the pleasures and the perils of trying to recall the Vikings through their linguistic traces, and the multiplicity of voices and approaches that this can involve. Along the way, we will take the opportunity to think about some of the roles of etymology and of etymologists in giving access to the vibrant connections and diversity of the medieval past.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Keynote Lecture: The Metaphors They Lived by: Verbal Imagery of Memory in the Middle Ages

Monday 02 July

Price: Free

Stage@Leeds: Stage 1

13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Farkas Gabor Kiss, Department for Early Hungarian Literature, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest

Introduction: Lucie Doležalová, Institute of Greek & Latin Studies, Univerzita Karlova, Praha and Jan Čermák, Department of English, Univerzita Karlova, Praha

Recent research suggests that human cognition relies on metaphor systems in the process of thinking, and metaphors have a fundamental role in human perception and understanding by allowing the mind to construct complex social, cultural, and psychological realities. In this lecture, I will discuss the main medieval trends in metaphoric descriptions of the mental processes of reminiscing and memorisation, focusing on the medieval Western tradition. Everyday mnemonic practices were commonly described using highly sophisticated metaphorical language, as knowledge was supposed to be 'sent to the memory cell', 'impressed on the mind', 'elevated', or 'dilated into the mental space'. The metaphor systems of memory have radically changed from Late Antiquity to the late Middle Ages, and the 12th century marked a turning point in this process, closely reflecting the revival of Greco-Arabic medicine, meditative spirituality, and dialectic thinking. The lack of first-language competence in Latin eased the invention and the acceptance of metaphoric expressions by the speakers, which in turn catalysed the vernacular usage of these phrases. Although I will mainly focus on the evolution of the medieval Latin imagery of memory (using primarily texts from the Victorine school and scholasticism), Arabic, Greek, and other European vernacular traditions will be considered, too.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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The Casale Pilgrim: a Journey Into Jewish Visual Representations of the Holy Land

Monday 02 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery

Gallery talk by: Marci Freedman

13.00 - 14.00

Travel has been a ubiquitous feature within the Jewish world. Whether as merchants, scholars, pilgrims, or refugees, there have always been Jews on the move. The medieval world particularly saw a rise in pilgrimage, making it one of the most studied medieval institutions. Jewish travel has been accompanied by a small, but rich body of Jewish travel writing; nevertheless, these texts remain largely understudied. Amongst these is the Casale Pilgrim, an illustrated pilgrimage through the Holy Land, dated 1597-8. Leeds University Library Special Collections possesses the only known copy (Leeds University Library, Roth MS. 220) making it a true treasure. Part of the manuscript collection of the notable Jewish historian Cecil Roth, this talk will shed light on the Casale Pilgrim and its unique status within the tradition of Jewish travel literature. The manuscript comprises 85 illustrations and offers an artistic interpretation of Jewish holy sites. This talk seeks to address what sites remained important to Jewish travellers (and readers) at the close of the 16th century. It will draw links between the captions and visualisation of Jewish sacred space and how these sites were described and depicted. The talk will also address the roots of this Jewish visual tradition, drawing from parallels in the Christian and Islamic traditions. In offering a frame of reference for this unique manuscript, we will be able to place the Casale pilgrim within the fields of travel literature, ‘mental pilgrimage’, and illustrated Jewish manuscripts more widely.

Marci Freedman completed an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds before completing her PhD at the School of Arts, Languages & Cultures at the University of Manchester. Her research areas include textual and intellectual history, with a focus on Jewish travel literature, and knowledge exchange between Jewish and Christian cultures.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and seven kilometres of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-18.00 during the Congress week, and IMC delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Monday 02 July

Price: £23.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

The John Rylands Library was founded by Enriqueta Rylands in memory of her husband John Rylands, Manchester’s first multi-millionaire. She commissioned architect Basil Champneys to design the striking neo-gothic building, which took ten years to build and was opened to the public on 01 January 1900.

The library became part of the University of Manchester in 1972 and currently houses the majority of the Special Collections of the University of Manchester Library. Mrs Rylands’s memorial to her husband is now part of the third largest academic library in the United Kingdom, and the Deansgate building houses over 400,000 printed volumes, and well over a million manuscripts and archival items.

Participants in the excursion will have the opportunity to tour the building, learning about its history and architecture, including the historic entrance and main staircase, where readers would have originally entered the building, and the Reading Room, the layout of which resembles a church, but with alcoves designed for private study. The tour will be followed by a private collections encounter with a range of medieval manuscripts, charters, and early printed books from the library’s collections.

This excursion will be led by John Hodgson, Manuscripts and Archives Manager, and Julianne Simpson, Rare Books and Maps Manager at the John Rylands Library.

Read the John Rylands Library webpage for more information

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Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture: Lights, Power, and the Moral Economy of Early Medieval Europe

Monday 02 July

Price: Free

Michael Sadler Building: Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre

19.00 - 20.00

Sponsor: Early Medieval Europe

Speaker: Paul Fouracre, Department of History, University of Manchester

Introduction: Marios Costambeys, Department of History, University of Liverpool and Simon MacLean, School of History, University of St Andrews

From Antiquity, light has been associated with power. Taking on board the Old Testament injunction to keep a light burning before the tabernacle, the Christian Church required all churches to burn a light before the altar, and saints’ shrines were also honoured with lights. As lighting was expensive it was initially the elite in society which made grants for lighting provision. It can be demonstrated that rulers made such grants at politically important moments. This lecture examines how the burden of providing for the lights spread into the wider population. In Francia this happened in two ways: precarial tenures created a class of rent payers (censuales or cerocensuales) whose rent was often designated for light provision, and, secondly, a proportion of the tithe was also assigned to the lights. From Carolingian legislation (capitularies, the canons of councils, and episcopal statutes) we can see a reform programme insisting on the maintenance of the lights. In the 10th century we see the first evidence of voluntary associations (guilds) forming for this purpose. Although the requirement to burn lights was universal, it is possible to identify significant differences in the way this requirement was met: top-down in West Francia, but by a growing class of ecclesiastical tributaries (the so-called Zensualität) in East Francia/Germany, by local arrangement in Italy and Spain, and apparently by quasi-taxation (‘wax-scot’) in England. The conjunction of religious belief, resource dedication, and social organisation is what makes up the moral economy here. The lecture seeks to understand the differences between the various regions of Europe and asks whether the subject of lighting can contribute to our understanding of social structuration in the Early Middle Ages.

The journal Early Medieval Europe (published by Wiley) is very pleased to sponsor the Annual Early Medieval Europe Lecture at the International Medieval Congress. By contributing a major scholarly lecture to the Congress programme, the journal aims to highlight the importance of the Congress to scholars working in early medieval European history and to support further research in this field. Early Medieval Europe is an interdisciplinary journal encouraging the discussion of archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, diplomatic, literature, onomastics, art history, linguistics, and epigraphy, as well as more traditional historical approaches. It covers Europe in its entirety, including material on Iceland, Ireland, the British Isles, Scandinavia, and Continental Europe (both west and east). Further information about the journal and details on how to submit material to it are available at the Wiley website. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the editorial board after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets for the event. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disapointment.

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Special Lecture: Black Legends, Bullying Queens, and the Wonders of Moorishland - How Spain Lives Its Medieval Past Today

Monday 02 July

Price: Free

Stage@Leeds: Stage 1

19.00 - 20.00

Sponsor: Instituto Cervantes / Centre for the History of Ibero-America, University of Leeds

Speaker: Giles Tremlett, The Guardian / The Economist

Introduction: Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds

This event has now been cancelled.

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'To lerne the tretis of the astrelabie': Astrolabe Workshop

Monday 02 July

Ticket Price: Free

Performed by: Kristine Larsen

Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.31

19.00-20.30

Most medieval scholars have heard of the astrolabe, part work of art and part personal computer. For centuries the instrument was used across both the Christian and Islamic worlds in order to calculate times of prayer, measure the height of the sun and stars above the horizon for navigation, and aid in surveying. It is a two-dimensional model of the three-dimensional heavens that you can hold in your hands.

Anyone who has ever tried to work their way through Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe without a basic astronomical knowledge might have (understandably) given up after the first few steps, but the astrolabe is actually not a daunting device if you just have some basic background. This hands-on workshop is a step-by-step walk-through of selected computations from Chaucer’s work, including computing the current local time from the apparent position of the sun and stars and finding one’s latitude.

The workshop is presented by Kristine Larsen (Professor of Astronomy at Central Connecticut State University), who has made similar presentations at the International Medieval Congress at Western Michigan University for several years, as well as numerous other universities and educational centres. The first 50 attendees will receive a free cardboard astrolabe as well as an instruction sheet (both theirs to keep).

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‘All thy best parts bound together’: Coptic Bookbinding Workshop

Monday 02 July

Price: £28.50

Directed by: Linette Withers

Clothworkers Building South: Room G.11B

19.00-21.00

In 1945, a collection of early Christian and Gnostic texts was discovered near the Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi. These leather-bound vellum codices, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries, were sealed within a jar which was found by a local farmer. These volumes were written in the Coptic language and bound in a single-section Coptic style, with covers of soft leather that were stiffened by sheets of waste papyrus. The first true form of the codex, the Coptic style of binding continued to be used until the 11th century.

Participants in the workshop will recreate one of the types of Coptic bindings used in the Nag Hammadi finds with goat leather and papyrus covers and linen thread. The internal pages of the book will be blank sketch paper. All materials will be provided.

Linette Withers completed an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds before joining the IMC team as Senior Congress Officer. She has been binding books since 2005 and since 2012 has worked as a professional book binder, producing codices that are inspired by historical books. Recently one of her works was shortlisted for display at the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford as part of their ‘Redesigning the Medieval Book’ competition and exhibition. She also regularly volunteers for library conservation projects and teaches binding techniques in her studio in Leeds.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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Music from the Ritson Manuscript

Monday 02 July

Price: £12.50

School of Music: Clothworkers Concert Hall

20.30-21.30

Performed by: The Clothworkers Consort of Leeds

The Clothworkers Consort of Leeds performs music from the Ritson Manuscript (London, British Library, Add. 5665). This manuscript contains a diverse collection of carols, masses, Latin liturgical and devotional texts, sacred chant, and secular and religious songs in English, representing a compendium of vocal music from the mid-15th to early 16th centuries. This programme will explore the diversity of the collection including two large-scale works by Thomas Pack (‘Lumen ad revelacionem gencium’ and an English Te Deum), a setting of the prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary against the plague, ‘Stella celi extirpavit’, the Marian antiphon ‘Salve regina’, and a range of carols and songs for small ensemble.

The Clothworkers Consort of Leeds (CCL) was formed in 2001 as a chamber choir which included the performance of sacred choral music in liturgical settings as one of its important aims. Since that time, it has developed into one of the finest choral ensembles in the north of England. The choir performs at services and gives concerts; it has collaborated with professional ensembles including Fretwork, QuintEssential Sackbut and Cornett Ensemble, Skipton Building Society Camerata, and Leeds Baroque Orchestra. The choir has performed in prestigious venues throughout the UK, including the Howard Assembly Room, St. Paul’s London, York Minster, and 15 English cathedrals. It has toured to the Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Hungary, and recorded three CDs: Songs of Praise: Music from the West Riding (2004), Vox Dei (2006), and No Man is an Island (2008). The choir has staged performances of Dido and Aeneas at Temple Newsam House and joined with Rambert Dance Company and London Musici for performances of Howard Goodall’s Eternal Light at the Grand Theatre in Leeds. The choir appeared on Corinne Bailey Rae’s second album, The Sea (2010), and recorded Stephen Kilpatrick’s title music for Michelle Lipton’s play, Amazing Grace, broadcast on BBC Radio 4. CCL has been involved in modern premieres of Philip Hayes’s The Judgment of Hermes (1783), with Skipton Camerata, and E. J. Loder’s music for Lord Byron’s Manfred at the Ilkley Literature Festival. In 2017 the choir made its Wigmore Hall debut in Music on the Verge of Destruction, subsequently broadcast on BBC Radio 3. This is the choir’s third appearance at the IMC.

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Medieval Highlights From Leeds University Library Special Collections

Tuesday 03 July, Wednesday 04 July, and Thursday 05 July

Price: Free

Parkinson Building: Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery

12.00 - 14.00

Join us for a drop-in session to see medieval treasures from Special Collections at the University of Leeds. Special Collections staff will be in the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery with a selection of highlights from the collections for delegates to examine close-up.

The collections at Leeds contain beautiful illuminated 15th-century French and Flemish books of hours, psalters, and prayer books, as well as German chained manuscripts from the 1450s. Some of these will be on show alongside examples from our fine collection of incunabula. The Library of Ripon Cathedral is held on long-term deposit in Special Collections at the University of Leeds and includes a Latin Bible from the 13th century. A highlight of the Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society Collection is the enormous series of surviving court rolls of the manor of Wakefield (1274-1925). Also for the first time at the IMC, we will be revealing examples from our extensive coin collection.

Special Collections houses over 200,000 rare books and 7 km of manuscripts and archives, including the celebrated Brotherton Collection. The Special Collections Reading Room is open from 09.00-17.00 during the IMC, and delegates are welcome to pursue their research and explore the collection. More details on how to search and use the collections can be found at https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections.

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Keynote Lecture: Historical Present: Fake History, Material Culture, and Collective Misremembering

Tuesday 03 July

Price: Free

Stage@Leeds: Stage 1

13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Alixe Bovey, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London

Introduction: Lucie Doležalová, Institute of Greek & Latin Studies, Univerzita Karlova, Praha and Jan Čermák, Department of English, Univerzita Karlova, Praha

We live in history, scurrying along streets with ancient names, past old buildings and historic landmarks, through protected landscapes, amidst plaques and statuary memorialising achievement and catastrophe. While the commemoration industry is focused on events that actually happened in the past - births, deaths, discoveries, battles, calamities - an important dimension of cultural memory concerns larger truths about origins and identities with a much looser connection to 'the facts of history'. The central example in this lecture is the complex legacy of the opening of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae, which describes how Trojan refugees exterminated Albion's indigenous giants and founded the British nation. How and why have material things (manuscript illuminations, printed books, turf-cut chalk drawings, elaborate costumes, immense figures in papier-mâché, oak, wicker, and even latex) preserved and embellished the memory of this foundation myth, alongside centuries of destruction, ridicule, indifference, and misunderstanding? Memory loss, confusion, and destruction are, it will be argued, essential pretexts for invention and survival, and underpin the dynamic interaction between material things, mythic history, and cultural memory.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Kirkstall Abbey

Tuesday 03 July

Price: £17.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 17.00

One of the best-preserved examples of a medieval Cistercian monastery in England can be seen within two miles of the International Medieval Congress. A daughter-house of Fountains, Kirkstall Abbey is remarkable for both the quality and extent of its preservation. Large parts of the church, chapter house, cloister, south range, and abbot’s lodging survive up to roof height. Complementing these impressive standing remains is the guest house, a rare survival in monastic precincts, which has been excavated extensively so that its structural developments are understood in great depth.

Despite its extensive architectural and archaeological remains, Kirkstall has received little scholarly attention, and the importance its material culture holds for understanding medieval religious life has consequently been neglected. However, the guesthouse has recently been the focus of extensive archaeological and historical enquiry and a subsequent AHRC-funded cultural engagement project has ensured that the findings of this research will be made freely available. This work has highlighted the importance of the guesthouse for the social life of the abbey, revealing how the monastic community provided hospitality to guests and entertained them within the precinct. New information concerning finds from the guesthouse, such as dress accessories, provides greater clarity regarding the identity of guests and what they did while at the abbey; the animal bones, meanwhile, provide an indication of the food eaten by guests and enable comparison with monastic fare. As a result, the guesthouse can now be set in the wider context of Kirkstall’s structures, which have been the subject of a number of modern restorations, permitting a more holistic appreciation of the life in the abbey during the Middle Ages.

The tour provides an overview of the history of the abbey from its establishment in 1152 and gives particular attention to the guesthouse and its importance in monastic life.

This excursion will be led by Katherine Baxter (Curator of Archaeology, Leeds Museums & Galleries) and Richard Thomason (Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies / Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Kent).

Find out more about Kirkstall Abbey on its website

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Art of the Sofer: Jewish Calligraphy Workshop

Tuesday 03 July

Price: £7.50

Directed by: Joseph Isaac Lifshitz

Clothworkers Building South: Room G.11B

19.00 - 20.30

Were all the skies parchment,
And all the reeds pens,
And all the oceans ink,
And all who dwell on earth scribes,
God’s grandeur could not be told.

Akdamut Millan, Rabbi Meir Ben Isaac Nehorai (died c. 1095)

‘Sofer’ is the Hebrew word for a scribe who can copy out the Torah, tefillin, and mezuzot, as well as other religious writings according to the laws of ‘sofrut’. If these laws are not followed, the text is not deemed to be valid. A sofer would be also responsible for preparing the kulmus (quill), klaf (parchment), and d’yo (ink) according to traditional methods.

In this workshop, Joseph Isaac Lifshitz will demonstrate the techniques of the medieval sofer. Participants will also learn to write medieval Hebrew characters with a quill on parchment. All materials will be provided.

Joseph Isaac Lifshitz is an expert on Jewish philosophy and history, with an emphasis on the philosophy of Ashkenaz in the high Middle Ages. He received his rabbinical ordination from Rabbis Yitzhak Kulitz and David Nesher. He earned his PhD in Jewish Thought from Tel Aviv University, and holds an MA in Jewish history from Touro College. Author of numerous books, most recently Judaism, Law & The Free Market (Acton, 2012), he has written both scholarly and popular articles on subjects related to Judaism and economics. He is also a qualified Hebrew scribe.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.

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New Voices Lecture: Transgender Lives in Byzantium

Tuesday 03 July

Price: Free

Michael Sadler Building: Rupert Beckett Theatre

19.00 - 20.00

Speaker: Roland Betancourt, Department of Art History, University of California, Irvine

Introduction: Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University

From the 5th to the 9th century, there are a series of saints’ Lives composed in the Greek-speaking Mediterranean that detail the lives of individuals assigned female at birth, who for a variety of reasons choose to live most of their lives as monks, usually presenting as male and passing as eunuchs within monastic communities. This talk takes these Lives and their popularity in later centuries as a starting point to consider the role of transgender and non-binary figures across the Late Antique and Byzantine world, covering the Greek, Coptic, and Syriac traditions. Weaving together saints’ Lives, rhetorical treatises, letters, and medical textbooks, this talk focuses on the host of bodily and medical practices deployed in the Byzantine world to alter or affirm a person’s gender identity. And, secondly, on Byzantine authors’ eloquent descriptions of non-binary and transgender identity, both for themselves and others. The figures discussed throughout this talk push against expectations of gender identity in the medieval world, rubbing against our own anachronistic notions of a binary gender construct, and demanding a revaluation of what transgender subjectivities could have looked like in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

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Detour to Paradise: Oswald von Wolkenstein and the Council of Constance (1414-1418)

Tuesday 03 July

Price: £12.00

Performed and staged by: Silvan Wagner

Stage@Leeds: Stage 2

20.30-21.30

Oswald von Wolkenstein (1376/77-1445), the travelling knight and courtly singer, paid several visits to Constance, the city of the famous Council.  In his poetry, he praised the city as ‘wünnikliches paradis’. Indeed, one area of the city, the site of a former monastery for Poor Clares, was called Paradies (literally ‘paradise’).

In 1415, Oswald visited Constance before joining the crusading army gathered by King John I in Portugal for the ‘Reconquista’ of Ceuta in North Africa. In contrast to the glories of Constance, this expedition, like so many of the other journeys that he had undertaken since his early years, greeted him with hardship and pain rather than paradisiacal pleasure. Recalling his many travels in his poetry, Oswald frequently invokes the sufferings he had to endure in other parts of the world from Europe to Africa and further east to Asia. From this perspective, the city of Constance in Germany, not far from Oswald’s home county Tyrol, offers a brief detour to Paradise.

Silvan Wagner, who has a PhD in medieval German literature from the University of Bayreuth, has gained a rich experience as a professional musician directing and producing multimedia dramas featuring the texts and illustrations of medieval love poetry and courtly epics. His productions bring together the musical principles of historically informed performance with acting medieval narrative literature, making him the ideal person to perform the music and poetry of Oswald von Wolkenstein. Accompanying himself with gittern and drum, he will bring the cosmopolitan knight to life in a programme that features the Council of Constance, its city, and its world in songs full of realistic detail, sparkling with wit, irony, and humor.

The International Medieval Congress and the Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft are proud to sponsor this unique musical event, creating new aesthetic means of bringing medieval poetry to life.

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Keynote Lecture: I Can't Remember the Middle Ages

Wednesday 04 July

Price: Free

Stage@Leeds: Stage 1

13.00 - 14.00

Speaker: Jeff Rider, Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Wesleyan University, Connecticut

Introduction: Lucie Doležalová, Institute of Greek & Latin Studies, Univerzita Karlova, Praha and Jan Čermák, Department of English, Univerzita Karlova, Praha

Because we remember our personal past, it is not surprising that we think of our imagination of the past in terms of memory. But memory is always personal and incommunicable. I cannot remember things I did not perceive, and I cannot communicate my memories to another person. I have to imagine any past other than my own. My memories of my past do, however, play an essential role in imagining pasts other than my own since they provide the material I use to imagine those pasts. When I imagine a past other than my own, I rearrange the stuff of my memories in new ways and this leads to new insights into my world of everyday experience and my place in it.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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York Minster

Wednesday 04 July

Price: £28.00

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

York Minister is the second largest Gothic cathedral in Northern Europe. At 70 m (230 ft), the top of York Minster’s central tower offers the best vantage point for viewing the city. Though the first church was erected on the site in 627, the present building was begun c. 1230 and completed over two centuries later. York Minster is also known for its remarkable collection of stained glass including the Great East Window, which is the largest expanse of medieval stained glass in Britain.

Yet the Minster is also important for what lies beneath ground level. Emergency excavations during the 1970s revealed not only the remains of the former Norman Minster, but also an Anglo-Saxon cemetery and Roman barracks. More recently, the Undercroft has been developed into ‘Revealing York Minster’, an interactive exhibition detailing the history of the site over the last 2,000 years, incorporating recent archaeological finds and artefacts never seen before on public display, such as the 1,000-year-old York Gospels.

This tour will involve a guided tour of York Minster as well as the opportunity to explore the new ‘Revealing York Minster’ Galleries in the Undercroft. Afterwards, there will be time for independent exploration of the Minster and the surrounding area.

This excursion will be led by Stuart Harrison (Ryedale Archaeology Services), who is the Cathedral Archaeologist at York Minster.

Find out more about York Minster on its website

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Dead Sisters Do Tell Tales: A Theatrical Reading of Modern Devout Sister-Books

Wednesday 04 July

19.00-20.00

Price: Free

Clothworkers Building South: Room G.11B

Written and produced by: Marly Terwisscha Van Scheltinga, Universiteit Antwerpen, Lieke Smits, Universiteit Leiden, and Godelinde Gertrude Perk, Mittuniversitets, Sundsvall

On a winter’s day, in the Dutch city of Deventer, a group of semi-religious women, all Sisters of the Common Life, start telling each other devotional tales, but their storytelling soon reveals that being a Sister does not make you a saint…

Retelling biographies from two collections from Modern Devout Sisters’ Houses, this theatrical reading in English reconstructs a medieval reading experience, including the modern audience in the community of holy women. We would like to welcome you to Master Geert’s House: join the Sisters as they wish to hear ‘edifying points of our elder Sisters’, but cannot agree on the most spiritually exemplary and enjoyable tale. At the same time, each Sister strives to tell the story of her own life, trying to fit into the community by adapting and adopting Modern Devout narrative conventions. Whose story will be heard and whose forgotten?

This performance brings to life the Sister-Books of Deventer and Diepenveen, two female-authored Middle Dutch texts. Originating from the bookish Devotio Moderna, a late-medieval religious movement encompassing both monastic and semi-monastic communities, these vitae are brimming with unforgettable scenes and local colour. Written and read in the very same Sisters’ House in which the narratives are set, these 15th-century texts not only recount Sisters’ lives; they also prompt the Sisters to overlay their lives with those of their predecessors and stage the departed Sisters’ devotional feats in the spaces inhabited by the living Sisters.

This theatrical reading explores how the Sister-Books construct the very community they describe, investigating how the Sister-Books surround the living Sisters with the presence of those gone before them. According to the Deventer Sister-Book, hearing these lives makes the departed Sisters ‘seem alive after death’; this research-by-performance event therefore also examines how the text includes and engages its audience. Ultimately, this performance illuminates medieval reading practices, the effect of aurality on text and reception, and medieval women’s literary activity. After the 45-minute performance, there will be time for discussion.

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Annual Medieval Academy of America Lecture: History and Visual Memory in the Library of King Charles V of France

Wednesday 04 July

Price: Free

Michael Sadler Building: Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre

19.00 - 20.00

Speaker: Anne D. Hedeman, Department of Art History, University of Kansas

Introduction: Sif Ríkharðsdóttir, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík

Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America

Medieval libraries were sites of memory that served to preserve knowledge, give access to the past, and establish both individual and group identity. When library collections moved through time, expanding in size and acquiring new readers, they shaped the memory of different social, personal, and political pasts. In this lecture I consider how the illustrations in books forming these collections participated in reshaping memories, enabling associations between texts that may not have been associated previously. This phenomenon is especially visible in the library founded and expanded by King Charles V in the Louvre. By considering diverse relationships established between his growing royal collection and the Grandes chroniques de France (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale, Ms. fr. 2813), one of Charles’ most treasured manuscripts, as it was made, disbound, extended with newly-written text, rebound, disbound, and expanded again with purely visual additions, I will show how visual relationships associated texts in order to create and sharpen particularly distinctive memories of the history of France.

The Medieval Academy is pleased once again to host the Annual Medieval Academy Lecture, an opportunity for the Academy to showcase some of the important work being done by scholars in North America. We hope you will join us for a reception immediately following the lecture, where members of the Medieval Academy staff will be available to answer questions about the Academy and its work. For more information about the Academy, please see http://www.medievalacademy.org. All those attending are warmly invited to join members of the Medieval Academy after the lecture for a glass of wine.

Please note that admission to this event will be on a first-come, first-served basis as there will be no tickets. Please ensure that you arrive as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

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Remember Death: Johannes Kolross’s Spil von Fünfferley betrachtnussen zur Buß (Play of Five Tableaux about Repentance), 1532

Wednesday 04 July

Price: Free

Beech Grove Plaza

19.00-20.30

Performed by: Theatergruppe Des Instituts Für Germanistik, Justus-liebig-universität, Giessen

Directed by: Cora Dietl

With live music from Peter Bull

‘Always be awake, and pray, / That I will not find you asleep in sin’, says Death, warning a young man, whom he had just struck down in the midst of a sinful dance. The youth begs for pardon, and Death allows him some extra time to repent before he finally has to die. ‘Memento mori’ is the central message of the play that the Reformed School teacher Johannes Kolross performed with his pupils in Bâle. The youth is quickly converted to a holy life, but will he succeed? The ‘Friends of World’ and Devil try to lead him into temptation, but he firmly holds onto his new way. Devil and his Seven Deadly Sins, though, are successful in convincing others, and thus the epilogue can only repeat the call to remember death.

The aesthetics of the play are very different from those of 16th-century comedies that are often influenced by Terence. It can sometimes resemble an extended sermon, which can be unfamiliar to a 21st-century audience. The theatre group of the University of Giessen’s German Department stages the play as part of the international research project ‘Theatres of Persuasion’, which focuses upon European morality plays of the 16th-century and uses experimental performances of these plays (preferably full length) in order to examine the theatrical potential of the seemingly merely rhetorical texts, once visual and acoustic effects are added, which are not recorded in the texts.

The Theatregruppe was founded by Cora Dietl in 2007, and has since been staging two medieval or early modern plays per year. The performances are always part of seminar courses in German literature, running from April until June/July or from October until December, with 50% new students each term, but with constant success, see: www.staff.uni-giessen.de/~g91159/archiv.htm

This production will be performed in German.

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Open Mic Night

Wednesday 04 July

Price: Free

Emmanuel Centre: Claire Chapel

20.00 - 22.00

Not with an actual microphone (that would be silly!), the IMC Open Mic Night offers a variety of fare from poetry readings to music, song, even dance sometimes. We have had music from the troubadours, Viking sagas, medieval poetry, and a variety of musical instruments. Medieval contributions are particularly welcome, but it is an opportunity to share anything you always wanted to perform with the international audience the IMC provides. Whether you come to perform or listen you will find the ambience of the Emmanuel Centre Claire Chapel and emcee Robin Fishwick's famous spiced fruit punch unforgettable.

Robin Fishwick is the Quaker Chaplain at the Universities Chaplaincy where he runs the Inspired Open Mic Nights. He is a bit of a singer/songwriter and plays a variety of instruments (some of them quite weird!).

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Southwell Minster and Town

Thursday 05 July

Price: £38.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 09.00 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Southwell is a well-concealed secret in the centre of Nottinghamshire. It is a very small town, with a grid of Georgian and Victorian houses and shops, surrounding the ruined former palace of the Archbishops of York, the remains of a square of medieval canons houses, rebuilt at the end of the 18th century, and one of the finest English small cathedrals, Southwell Minster.

The earliest occupation at Southwell has recently been found to be a 1st-century Roman site, perhaps originally built as a temple to the north of the main Roman road, the Fosse Way from Lincoln to Exeter. This was rebuilt several times, and seems to have ended as a large courtyard villa, perhaps connected with the nearby Lindum Colonia, the capital of Britannia Secunda. The villa was abandoned, and part of the site was used for a small pagan cemetery. During the 8th century a small church with a Christian cemetery was built on the villa site.

In the middle of the 10th century the villa and its associated territory were given to Oscetyl, the first West Saxon archbishop of York, to strengthen his authority at the start of the reconquest of Viking Yorkshire. He set up a community of canons beside his manor house, together with a small church. This was enlarged on a grand scale during the 12th century, expanded with a new east arm after 1234, and was finally adorned with an exquisite chapter house at the end of the 13th century, famous for its carvings of leaves and flowers, called by Pevsner the ‘Leaves of Southwell’. At the Reformation the college of canons and archbishop’s chapel were converted to a parish church, with a couple of priests who served the needs of the small town. The palace was abandoned. The 18th century saw steady decay, with a major fire which destroyed the medieval roofs. All of this was remedied during the middle and later 19th century, when the Church Commissioners funded a thorough restoration under their architect, Ewan Christian. At the end of the process the church was adopted as the cathedral of the new diocese of Nottingham and Derby, one of the several new dioceses created for the industrial towns of the Midlands and North, and part of the palace ruins was rebuilt to provide a house for the new bishop. The cathedral also has a fine series of stained glass windows by the notable 20th-century artists Christopher Whall and Patrick Reyntiens, as well as four 16th-century panels rescued from destruction in Paris at the Revolution and now housed in the choir. This excursion will trace the history of this important site, from the Romans to the 19th century, and will visit both the cathedral and the former archbishop’s palace.

Philip Dixon (Archaeological Consultant for Southwell Minster) and Jenny Alexander (Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick) will lead this excursion. Packed lunches will be provided.

Find out more about Southwell Minster on its website

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Conisbrough Castle

Thursday 05 July

Price: £24.50

Depart Parkinson Steps: 13.30 Arrive Parkinson Steps: 19.00

Although famously depicted in Sir Walter Scott’s novel Ivanhoe, the little-visited Conisbrough Castle remains one of Yorkshire’s best-kept secrets. The cylindrical keep, which is supported by six semi-hexagonal buttresses, remains largely intact. The late 12th-century round keep is described as ‘one of the finest examples of late Norman defensive architecture’. The four-storey Norman keep is exceptionally well-preserved, both internally and externally, and reaches a height of 27 m (90 ft). The keep speaks of authority, security, and strength.

At the time of the Norman Conquest the manor of Conisbrough was held by King Harold. After Harold’s defeat at Hastings, the property was given to William, the first Earl Warenne and the son-in-law of William I. Little remains, however, of the original castle that he built on the site. The surviving keep dates from the time of the fifth earl, Hamelin Plantagenet, the illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou; its cylindrical shape is unique amongst English castles, the nearest parallel being the keep at Mortemer, near Dieppe in France, a castle also held by the Warenne family.

It is not just defensive in nature; the surviving remains are a great reminder that it was a residence. Within its walls sits the largest hooded fireplace of its date, an impressive private chapel, and a fine processional staircase. There are, moreover, private latrines and fresh running water supplied by the two large water-storage tanks on the roof, which are fully accessible since the keep has been re-roofed and re-floored, making it possible for visitors to climb to the top of the tower.

As well as being a royal castle at various periods in its history, Conisbrough also bears an aura of romance and legend, having partly inspired, and appeared in, Scott’s Ivanhoe, published in 1819. Set in 1194, Scott described the castle as a ‘Saxon fortress’ and one that was used by the thane Athelstane, the last of the Saxon royal line. This is, of course, incorrect as the entire work is fictitious. However, it has not prevented Conisbrough becoming a centre for Scott aficionados.

This excursion will be led by Audrey Thorstad (School of History, Welsh History & Archaeology, Bangor University).

Find out more about Conisbrough Castle on its website

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Making Leeds Medieval

Thursday 05 July

Price: Free

Leeds University Union, University Square, and the Marquee

10.30 - 18.00

As the IMC 2018 draws to a close, join us in and around University Square for a range of activities, including a market featuring local produce and historical craft demonstrations. The Medieval Craft Fair will once again be extended to include a second day of trading during Making Leeds Medieval. Come and browse a range of hand-crafted items including hand-bound books, historically-inspired woodwork, haberdashery, historic beads, and jewellery.

The Historical and Archaeological Societies Fair will be scheduled to coincide with Making Leeds Medieval, providing a unique opportunity to find out more about some of the many independent groups within the UK actively involved in preserving local and national history.

Similar to previous years, Making Leeds Medieval will also feature a birds of prey display, live music, and combat displays.

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7 Ways a Medievalist Can Earn Income outside Academia

Friday 06 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: Medievalists.net

Social Sciences Building: Room 10.06

Tutor: Danièle Cybulskie and Peter Konieczny, Medievalists.net

The scholars coming to the International Medieval Congress know that it is challenging to find career opportunities once they have finished a PhD. There is much competition for work at universities, and not all graduates will be able to find work as an academic. But there are other options.

This three-hour seminar will take a look at how a medievalist can earn money, and perhaps find a career, using their knowledge of the Middle Ages. Specifically, we take a look at the following possible paths:

1) Books - writing for publishers and self-publishing
2) Magazines - writing for history and non-history magazines
3) The Internet - creating your own website or digital content
4) YouTube and Podcasts - finding ways to create your own media brand
5) Publishing - working in publishing or creating your own business
6) Travel and Tourism - using your knowledge of local history
7) Public History - working for museums, historical sites, fairs, and festivals

Leading the discussion is Peter Konieczny, the founder of Medievalists.net, the largest website devoted to the Middle Ages. He is also the editor of Medieval Warfare magazine. Joining him will be Danièle Cybulskie, author of The Five-Minute Medievalist.

Peter Konieczny was a librarian at the University of Toronto before becoming part-owner of Medievalists.net. He has been developing websites for 15 years and is based in Toronto. Peter has extensive experience in web design, blogging, social media, and the use of digital media to support the dissemination of scholarship to wide-ranging audiences.

Danièle Cybulskie studied Cultural Studies and English Literature at Trent University, earning her MA in English Literature at the University of Toronto. A featured writer at Medievalists.net, she has been published in three international magazines, and her book, The Five-Minute Medievalist, debuted at No.1 on Amazon's Canadian charts. She also worked as the subject matter expert for OntarioLearn's 'The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction', currently offered at nine colleges. Having left college teaching behind, she now divides her time between giving workshops, writing articles, and working on her second book.

Since 2008, Medievalists.net has billed itself as the media site for the Middle Ages, offering news, articles, and videos about medieval studies. It is one of the largest online resources about the Middle Ages, and has amassed over 35 million page views.

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Medieval Records and The National Archives: A Workshop

Friday 06 July

Ticket Price: £7.50

Sponsored by: The National Archives

Social Sciences Building: Room 10.07

Tutor: Sean Cunningham, Paul Dryburgh, and Euan Roger, The National Archives, Kew

09.30 - 13.30

For all medievalists the ability to locate, read, and understand archival sources is fundamental to their research whatever their discipline and stage in their career. The National Archives of the United Kingdom (TNA) holds one of the world’s largest and most important collections of medieval records. The vast archive of English royal government informs almost every aspect of medieval life from the royal court to the peasantry, land ownership and tenure, the law, warfare and diplomacy, trade and manufacture, transport, credit and debt, death and memory, material culture, literature, art and music. However, finding, using, and interpreting the rich diversity of material is not always entirely straightforward, and its potential for a wide range of research uses is often unclear. This workshop will offer an introduction to TNA, show you how to begin your research into its collections, and access research support. A course-pack with facsimiles of original documents will be used to illustrate the range of disciplines and topics TNA records can inform and illuminate. Short, themed sessions will also introduce attendees to the Mechanics of Medieval Government, Law and Justice, and Material and Literary Culture.

This workshop is aimed at all medievalists, from masters students through to experienced academics in any discipline, who wish to discover more about the rich archive collections at TNA and how they might use them in their research. There are no pre-requisites for attending the workshop, although a basic knowledge of Latin is recommended.

Sean Cunningham is Head of Medieval & Early Modern and specialises in 15th- and 16th-century records of English royal government. Euan Roger is a Medieval Records Specialist whose research has focussed on church, government, and law in the late Middle Ages. Paul Dryburgh is a Principal Medieval Records Specialist with interests in government, politics, and warfare in the British Isles in the 13th and 14th centuries.

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'Of armed alabaster': Medieval Military Effigies of West Yorkshire - A Workshop

Friday 06 July

Ticket Price: £39.50

Sponsored by: The Royal Armouries Museum

Tutors: Keith Dowen, Royal Armouries, Leeds

09.30 - 17.30

This workshop has now been cancelled.

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Terms and Conditions

Events

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel events due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Excursions

We recommend that you reserve your place on the excursions by registering as early as possible, as seats on the coach will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Please make a note of how participation in the excursions will affect your meal requirements, and note also the time of departure from and return to the University of Leeds in relation to other commitments, and book accordingly. Sensible footwear is recommended, as the wearing of high-heeled shoes is impractical at most sites, and prohibited at some. Most excursions will involve a significant amount of walking and/or standing, please contact the IMC if you have any questions or concerns about a particular excursion. It would also be advisable to bring raincoats. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We ask that those participating in excursions arrive at the steps of the Parkinson Building 15 minutes before the excursion is due to leave. A member of staff will be present in this area to provide information.

The IMC administration reserves the right to cancel excursions due to unforeseen circumstances, and to alter the schedule at short notice if necessary. Please note that all times are approximate. Prices for the excursions include coach transport, entrance fees and donations to the sites, fees for the guides, staffing, and administration costs. Meals are not included in the price unless otherwise indicated.

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