Accessibility  Mobile app accessibility statements

The University of Leeds makes several mobile apps available. These are either developed in house, supplied by a vendor with some customisations, or provided without any adjustments.

We know there are University mobile applications that are not fully compliant with WCAG 2.1 AA guidelines. We will work to make our current apps accessible where possible and will endeavour to procure accessible apps.

Some of our mobile applications fall outside the regulations, haven’t been updated since September 2019, or are no longer in use. Accessibility statements will not be available for these applications.

Apps covered by the regulations

Accessibility statement for the LeedsIMC mobile application

This accessibility statement applies to the LeedsIMC mobile application. It is available for iOS and Android devices.

This app is controlled by the University of Leeds and is intended for use by members of the public as well as students and staff of the University.

While we are working actively to resolve the accessibility issues with this app AbilityNet has advice that may make it more usable in its current state.

How accessible this mobile application is

We know some parts of this mobile application are not fully accessible:

  • Session locations are shown in a way that doesn’t work well with assistive technologies, such as iOS VoiceOver. This will make it hard to some to find where sessions are. For additional support, on-campus International Medieval Congress delegates are encouraged to visit the Information Desk in The Refectory (on the Precinct in the centre of campus, just off the corner of Lifton Place and Cromer Terrace) or to email the IMC team ahead of time via imc@leeds.ac.uk.
  • The significance of the cloud icons next to some speakers' profile images isn't communicated.
  • On an individual speaker's page it’s not always clear which parts of the page refer to the start time, location, or speakers of the events they’re attending.
  • Headings structure is applied incorrectly throughout the app, which may make it harder to understand information for users of screen readers.
  • Parts of the 'Speakers' screen, such as the speaker name, information and image aren’t picked up by iOS VoiceOver. This also means a screen reader user would have no way of knowing to where each of the 'More options' buttons next to each speaker lead as they lose the surrounding context. This might mean the screen is harder to understand and use for screen reader users.
  • On an individual speaker's page, session descriptors/tags (e.g. 'Academic session', 'In-person session') are not read out so this information is not available for iOS VoiceOver users. Also, the information in the sessions they are a part of isn’t always read out in a useful order. Users of screen readers may struggle to gather all the information on these pages.
  • The green and orange speaker descriptors/tags (e.g. 'Organiser', 'Speaker', 'Moderator') do not meet contrast requirements, so could be more difficult to see for some partially sighted or colour blind people.
  • On the ‘Sign in’ screen, the 'Get Support' link doesn't work. This could pose difficulties for all users. People are encouraged to use this link to the ‘Support’ page or to email the IMC team via imc@leeds.ac.uk.
  • Items in the app's main menu do not respond to name-based navigation commands from iOS VoiceControl. The notifications badge doesn't have an accessible name so it doesn't respond to name-based navigation commands from iOS VoiceControl. This may make moving around the app less intuitive for users of voice navigation.
  • On the ‘Speakers’ screen, the 'Skip to menu' button doesn't communicate whether the A to Z menu is open or closed via iOS VoiceOver. Nonetheless, screen reader users are advised to toggle this button when they first encounter it otherwise it will be necessary to scroll through 26 jump links of the A to Z to get to the main screen content.

If convenient, some people may find the desktop browser version of the LeedsIMC app works better with assistive technologies.

Feedback and contact information

For technical support queries, please make contact with the Technical Support IMC 2022 profile in the mobile or desktop apps. If you need information in this mobile application in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille, please make contact through IT Services:

Reporting accessibility problems with this mobile application

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this mobile application. For technical support queries, please make contact with the Technical Support IMC 2022 profile in the mobile or desktop apps. If you find any problems not listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, please make contact through IT Services and provide the mobile application you’re using and the issue you’ve identified:

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

More information about access to our campus is available in information for disabled visitors.

If you have any specific questions, details for different sections of the University are listed on our contact page.

Technical information about this mobile application’s accessibility

University of Leeds is committed to making its mobile applications accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Compliance status

This mobile application is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances and exemptions listed below.

Non-accessible content

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

These issues have been found via simple testing of the mobile application. There may be more accessibility problems than mentioned here.

Non-compliance with the accessibility regulations

We plan to address all the following issues by December 2022.

  • Via the ‘Agenda’ page, session location is shown via an interactive map. The venue name for a session is described in text but the address is not. It won't be possible for a screen reader user to find a venue's location via the app alone. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • The significance of the cloud icons next to some speakers' profile images isn't communicated. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • On an individual speaker's page several informative icons aren’t communicated. Their aria labels aren't announced by iOS VoiceOver, most notably under the sessions they are attending: 'Starts at...', 'Location...', and 'Speakers...'. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • On the launch screen when logged out, the notice to users that they must be logged in is marked up as a heading 3 without acting as a heading. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A).
  • On the 'Speakers' screen, the speaker name, information and image cannot be programmatically determined by iOS VoiceOver. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A).
  • On an individual speaker's page, session descriptors/tags (e.g. 'Academic session', 'In-person session') are not read out so this information is not available for iOS VoiceOver users. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A).
  • On an individual speaker's profile, the reading order of the information in the sessions they are a part of does not have a useful reading order. Session categorisation displayed above a session title is read last. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence (Level A).
  • The green and orange speaker descriptors/tags (e.g. 'Organiser', 'Speaker', 'Moderator') do not meet the 3:1 contrast ratio against the white background. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.4.11 Non-text Contrast (Level AA).
  • On the ‘Sign-in’ screen focus defaults to the 'Forgot your password' link under sign-in form, not to the top of the screen. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • On the ‘Speakers’ screen, speaker names, images and other information don’t focus via iOS VoiceOver. This also means a blind user has no way of knowing which speaker each 'More options' button relates to. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • On the ‘Speakers’ screen, each speaker's 'More Options' link doesn't make sense in the surrounding context because the speaker names, images and other information never receive focus in iOS VoiceOver. A blind user would have no way of knowing where each 'More options' button leads to. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.4: Link Purpose (In Context) (Level A).
  • On the ‘Sign in’ screen, the 'Get Support' link doesn't work. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.1 Parsing (Level A).
  • Items in the app's main menu do not respond to name-based navigation commands from iOS VoiceControl. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • The notifications badge doesn't have a name that can be programmatically determined so it doesn't respond to name-based navigation commands from iOS VoiceControl. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • On the ‘Speakers’ screen, the 'Skip to menu' button doesn't communicate whether the A to Z menu is open or closed via iOS VoiceOver. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • On the launch screen when logged out, 'Loading SVG' status communicated but retains focus even after load. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.3 Status Messages (Level AA).
Disproportionate burden

We aren’t claiming disproportionate burden against any of the mobile application’s accessibility problems at this time.

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations
Non-applicable criteria

Several WCAG 2.1 AA criteria do not apply to mobile applications according to the European Standard EN 301 549 ‘Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services’ (PDF) referenced by The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018. As a result, addressing these criteria isn’t in scope for this mobile application at this time.

The non-applicable WCAG 2.1 AA criteria are as follows:

  • 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A) – This relates to giving users a way to skips block of content that are repeated on multiple screens. EN 301 549 says this doesn’t apply to a single piece of software.
  • 2.4.2 Page Titled (Level A) – Mobile applications don’t have pages in the same way websites do. EN 301 549 says an app name could describe its topic or purpose but it’s not practical to make it both unique and descriptive as the WCAG criterion requires.
  • 2.4.5 Multiple Ways (Level AA) – This is supposed to allow people more than one way to get to a web page. EN 301 549 says this refers to sets of web pages and that there’s no equivalent in software.
  • 3.1.2 Language of Parts (Level AA) – On a web page this means that the code needs to point out which words are in a different language. EN 301 549 regards this as not being possible in software.
  • 3.2.3 Consistent Navigation (Level AA) – This refers to keeping navigation methods in the same order within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.
  • 3.2.4 Consistent Identification (Level AA) – This refers to keeping names for parts of page consistent within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.

What we’re doing to improve accessibility

The University of Leeds has a Web Accessibility Project that is working towards full WCAG 2.1 AA compliance for the majority of the most-used sites within the University’s web estate.

Addressing the compliance of mobile applications falls outside the scope of this project. Nonetheless, colleagues are working to improve the compliance of all mobile applications that should be accessible as well as all websites and browser-based systems.

Preparation of this accessibility statement

This statement was prepared on 28 June 2022. It was last reviewed on 28 June 2022.

This mobile application was last tested on 27 June 2022. The test was carried out by the University of Leeds.

The testing consisted of the following:

  • Selecting a sample of screens including the sign-up, log-in, home, agenda/programme, and speakers screens.
  • Assessing all these screens using an iPhone with iOS VoiceOver and VoiceControl.
  • Checking items on each page for colour contrast failures.
  • Checking whether the mobile application responded to changes in device orientation.

Accessibility statement for the GFaL Club mobile application

This accessibility statement applies to the GFaL Club mobile application. It is available for iOS and Android devices.

This app is controlled by the University of Leeds and is intended for use by members of the public as well as students and staff of the University.

While we are working actively to resolve the accessibility issues with this app AbilityNet has advice that may make it more usable in its current state.

How accessible this mobile application is

We know some parts of this mobile application are not fully accessible:

  • On the ‘Loyalty’ screen viewers are not told that, or where, the QR code image is displayed. This is likely to make that functionality harder to use for blind or partially sighted people. 
  • The sign-up form is placed within a table for layout purposes but it’s set in a way that means the rows and columns are announced by iOS VoiceOver. This information isn’t useful so may make filling in the form more difficult.
  • There are many colour contrast issues caused by the shade of orange used in the app not being dark enough. These include problems with orange text on a white background throughout the app, the orange navigation bar, the active 'Create Account' button on the sign-up page, and the button outlines on the home screen. These may all be hard to read or see for partially sighted or colourblind users.
  • When the ‘Sign up’ page is on screen, iOS VoiceOver still reads objects from the 'Log in' screen as well as those on the 'Sign up' page. This likely makes using the form harder for screen reader users.
  • On the ‘Loyalty’ screen, iOS VoiceOver reads text in the lower half of the screen before information at the top of the screen that explains how the screen should be used. This makes is likely to be confusing for screen reader users.
  • Names for the home, menu, and close menu buttons along with names for the icon links along the lowest edge of the screen on the ‘Loyalty’ screen aren’t shown in iOS VoiceControl. This likely makes the app harder to use for people who use voice navigation technology. 
Feedback and contact information

If you need information in this mobile application in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille, please make contact through IT Services:

Reporting accessibility problems with this mobile application

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this mobile application. If you find any problems not listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, please make contact through IT Services and provide the mobile application you’re using and the issue you’ve identified:

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

More information about access to our campus is available in information for disabled visitors.

If you have any specific questions, details for different sections of the University are listed on our contact page.

Technical information about this mobile application’s accessibility

University of Leeds is committed to making its mobile applications accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Compliance status

This mobile application is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances and exemptions listed below.

Non-accessible content

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

These issues have been found via simple testing of the mobile application. There may be more accessibility problems than mentioned here.

Non-compliance with the accessibility regulations

We plan to address all the following issues by December 2022.

  • On the ‘Loyalty’ screen viewers are not told of the QR code. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • The sign-up form is placed within a table for layout purposes but is not tagged as such. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A).
  • Orange text is used on a white background throughout the app with a contrast ratio of 2.59:1. This fails both the 3:1 and 4.5:1 ratio for text. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.4.3: Contrast (Minimum) (Level AA).
  • The orange navigation bar, orange of the active 'Create Account' button on the sign-up page, and the button outlines on the home screen do not have strong enough contrast against the white background. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.4.11 Non-text Contrast (Level AA).
  • Objects from the 'Log in' screen behind the 'Sign up' page receive focus before items in the 'Sign up' page. Focus also moves to the top of the hidden 'Log in' page after making a selection in a drop-down menu. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • Focus doesn't move to the page menu when it's opened. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • On the ‘Loyalty’ screen, text in the lower half of the screen receives focus before information at the top of the screen that explains how screen content should be used. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • The 'Outlet' boxes contain empty links. The links should be removed or used to describe the functionality and/or target of that link. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.4.4: Link Purpose (In Context) (Level A).
  • Names for the home, menu, and close menu buttons cannot be programmatically determined. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • On the ‘Loyalty’ screen, names for the icon links along the lowest edge of the screen cannot be programmatically determined. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
Disproportionate burden

We aren’t claiming disproportionate burden against any of the mobile application’s accessibility problems at this time.

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations
Non-applicable criteria

Several WCAG 2.1 AA criteria do not apply to mobile applications according to the European Standard EN 301 549 ‘Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services’ (PDF) referenced by The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018. As a result, addressing these criteria isn’t in scope for this mobile application at this time.

The non-applicable WCAG 2.1 AA criteria are as follows:

  • 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A) – This relates to giving users a way to skips block of content that are repeated on multiple screens. EN 301 549 says this doesn’t apply to a single piece of software.
  • 2.4.2 Page Titled (Level A) – Mobile applications don’t have pages in the same way websites do. EN 301 549 says an app name could describe its topic or purpose but it’s not practical to make it both unique and descriptive as the WCAG criterion requires.
  • 2.4.5 Multiple Ways (Level AA) – This is supposed to allow people more than one way to get to a web page. EN 301 549 says this refers to sets of web pages and that there’s no equivalent in software.
  • 3.1.2 Language of Parts (Level AA) – On a web page this means that the code needs to point out which words are in a different language. EN 301 549 regards this as not being possible in software.
  • 3.2.3 Consistent Navigation (Level AA) – This refers to keeping navigation methods in the same order within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.
  • 3.2.4 Consistent Identification (Level AA) – This refers to keeping names for parts of page consistent within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.

What we’re doing to improve accessibility

The University of Leeds has a Web Accessibility Project that is working towards full WCAG 2.1 AA compliance for the majority of the most-used sites within the University’s web estate.

Addressing the compliance of mobile applications falls outside the scope of this project. Nonetheless, colleagues are working to improve the compliance of all mobile applications that should be accessible as well as all websites and browser-based systems.

Preparation of this accessibility statement

This statement was prepared on 24 June 2022. It was last reviewed on 24 June 2022.

This mobile application was last tested on 21 June 2022. The test was carried out by the University of Leeds.

The testing consisted of the following:

  • Selecting a sample of screens including the sign-up screen, the log-in screen, and all parts of the app immediately reachable via the app’s main screen.
  • Assessing all these screens using an iPhone with iOS VoiceOver and VoiceControl.
  • Checking items on each page for colour contrast failures.
  • Checking whether the app responded to changes in device orientation.
     

Accessibility statement for the RRapid mobile application

This accessibility statement applies to the RRapid mobile application. It is available for iOS and Android devices.

This app is controlled by the University of Leeds and is intended for use by members of the public as well as students and staff of the University.

While we are working actively to resolve the accessibility issues with this app AbilityNet has advice that may make it more usable in its current state.

How accessible this mobile application is

We know some parts of this mobile application are not fully accessible:

  • The app doesn’t provide context or instruction for how best to engage with it. People who are new to using the app may find it difficult to navigate, especially those who use assistive technology.
  • The app doesn’t respond to a switch from portrait to landscape orientation, so may be difficult to use for those who need their device positioned this way.
  • There is text in images in the RRapid eBook section. This doesn’t always come with a functioning description either in code or in nearby text. It will be difficult for those with partial or no sight to use some of this app, particularly in the self-test questions area.
  • eBook video content doesn’t come with captions, audio description or a media alternative. This will cause difficulties for Deaf/deaf people, those who are hard of hearing, blind people and vision-impaired people.
  • The reading order communicated to assistive technologies, such as screen readers, is incorrect in some places, including the title page of the eBook. This may cause confusion for some users, such as people using screen readers.
  • There are contrast issues with some coloured navigation buttons, such as on the ‘Medical Emergencies’ section. Some buttons don’t have strong enough contrast against the app’s white background and/or there’s poor contrast between the button background and the button text.
  • Some parts of the interface cannot be accessed via a keyboard or screen reader interaction, such as the ‘Start course’ button on the ‘Test your knowledge’ page of the eBook section.
  • There are problems with focus when using a screen reader, including pop-ups not automatically receiving focus and focus becoming lost in the app’s menu when it’s hidden.
  • Some navigation buttons do not have accessible names, which will make it more difficult to control the app via voice control technology.
  • The app has a checklist functionality but problems with the coding mean that it won’t be apparent to screen reader users which items are part of a checklist, nor when those items have been checked or unchecked.
Feedback and contact information

If you need information in this mobile application in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille, please make contact through IT Services:

Reporting accessibility problems with this mobile application

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this mobile application. If you find any problems not listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, please make contact through IT Services and provide the mobile application you’re using and the issue you’ve identified:

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

More information about access to our campus is available in information for disabled visitors.

If you have any specific questions, details for different sections of the University are listed on our contact page.

Technical information about this mobile application’s accessibility

University of Leeds is committed to making its mobile applications accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Compliance status

This mobile application is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances and exemptions listed below.

Non-accessible content

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

These issues have been found via simple testing of the mobile application. There may be more accessibility problems than mentioned here.

Non-compliance with the accessibility regulations

We plan to address all the following issues by December 2022.

  • The app doesn’t provide context or instruction for how best to engage with it. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A).
  • The app doesn’t respond to a switch from portrait to landscape orientation. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.4 Orientation (Level AA).
  • Text in images don’t always come with a functioning description either in code or in nearby text. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • Video content doesn’t come with captions, audio description or a media alternative. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criteria 1.2.2 Captions (Prerecorded) (Level A), 1.2.3 Audio Description or Media Alternative (Prerecorded) (Level A), 1.2.5 Audio Description (Prerecorded) (Level AA).
  • The reading order is incorrect in some places. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence (Level A).
  • Some buttons don’t have strong enough contrast against the app’s white background and/or there’s poor contrast between the button background and the button text. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criteria 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum) (Level AA) and 1.4.11 Non-text Contrast (Level AA).
  • Some parts of the interface cannot be accessed via a keyboard or screen reader interaction. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.1.1 Keyboard (Level A).
  • There are problems with pop-ups not automatically receiving focus and focus becoming lost in the app’s menu when it’s hidden. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criteria 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A) and 2.4.7 Focus Visible (Level AA).
  • Some navigation buttons do not have accessible names. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • The app’s checklist functionality isn’t properly labelled. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
Disproportionate burden

We aren’t claiming disproportionate burden against any of the mobile application’s accessibility problems at this time.

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations
Non-applicable criteria

Several WCAG 2.1 AA criteria do not apply to mobile applications according to the European Standard EN 301 549 ‘Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services’ (PDF) referenced by The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018. As a result, addressing these criteria isn’t in scope for this mobile application at this time.

The non-applicable WCAG 2.1 AA criteria are as follows:

  • 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A) – This relates to giving users a way to skips block of content that are repeated on multiple screens. EN 301 549 says this doesn’t apply to a single piece of software.
  • 2.4.2 Page Titled (Level A) – Mobile applications don’t have pages in the same way websites do. EN 301 549 says an app name could describe its topic or purpose but it’s not practical to make it both unique and descriptive as the WCAG criterion requires.
  • 2.4.5 Multiple Ways (Level AA) – This is supposed to allow people more than one way to get to a web page. EN 301 549 says this refers to sets of web pages and that there’s no equivalent in software.
  • 3.1.2 Language of Parts (Level AA) – On a web page this means that the code needs to point out which words are in a different language. EN 301 549 regards this as not being possible in software.
  • 3.2.3 Consistent Navigation (Level AA) – This refers to keeping navigation methods in the same order within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.
  • 3.2.4 Consistent Identification (Level AA) – This refers to keeping names for parts of page consistent within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.

What we’re doing to improve accessibility

The University of Leeds has a Web Accessibility Project that is working towards full WCAG 2.1 AA compliance for the majority of the most-used sites within the University’s web estate.

Addressing the compliance of mobile applications falls outside the scope of this project. Nonetheless, colleagues are working to improve the compliance of all mobile applications that should be accessible as well as all websites and browser-based systems.

Preparation of this accessibility statement

This statement was prepared on 24 June 2022. It was last reviewed on 24 June 2022.

This mobile application was last tested on 21 June 2022. The test was carried out by the University of Leeds.

The testing consisted of the following:

  • Selecting a sample of screens including the main app screen and all parts of the app immediately reachable via the app’s main menu.
  • Assessing all these screens using an iPhone with iOS VoiceOver and VoiceControl.
  • Checking items on each page for colour contrast failures.
  • Checking whether the app responded to changes in device orientation.
     

Accessibility statement for the RRapid eBook mobile application

This accessibility statement applies to the RRapid eBook mobile application. It is available for iOS and Android devices.

This app is controlled by the University of Leeds and is intended for use by members of the public as well as students and staff of the University.

While we are working actively to resolve the accessibility issues with this app AbilityNet has advice that may make it more usable in its current state.

How accessible this mobile application is

We know some parts of this mobile application are not fully accessible:

  • The app doesn’t respond to a switch from portrait to landscape orientation, so may be difficult to use for those who need their device positioned this way.
  • There is text in images. This doesn’t always come with a functioning description either in code or in nearby text. It will be difficult for those with partial or no sight to use some of this app, particularly in the self-test questions area.
  • Video content doesn’t come with captions, audio description or a media alternative. This will cause difficulties for Deaf/deaf people, those who are hard of hearing, blind people and vision-impaired people.
  • The reading order communicated to assistive technologies, such as screen readers, is incorrect in some places, including the title page. This may cause confusion for some users, such as people using screen readers.
  • Some parts of the interface cannot be accessed via a keyboard or screen reader interaction, such as the ‘Start course’ button on the ‘Test your knowledge’ page.
  • There are problems with focus when using a screen reader, including pop-ups not automatically receiving focus.
  • Some navigation buttons do not have accessible names, which will make it more difficult to control the app via voice control technology.
Feedback and contact information

If you need information in this mobile application in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille, please make contact through IT Services:

Reporting accessibility problems with this mobile application

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this mobile application. If you find any problems not listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, please make contact through IT Services and provide the mobile application you’re using and the issue you’ve identified:

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

More information about access to our campus is available in information for disabled visitors.

If you have any specific questions, details for different sections of the University are listed on our contact page.

Technical information about this mobile application’s accessibility

University of Leeds is committed to making its mobile applications accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Compliance status

This mobile application is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances and exemptions listed below.

Non-accessible content

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

These issues have been found via simple testing of the mobile application. There may be more accessibility problems than mentioned here.

Non-compliance with the accessibility regulations

We plan to address all the following issues by December 2022.

  • The app doesn’t respond to a switch from portrait to landscape orientation. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.4 Orientation (Level AA).
  • Text in images don’t always come with a functioning description either in code or in nearby text. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content (Level A).
  • Video content doesn’t come with captions, audio description or a media alternative. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criteria 1.2.2 Captions (Prerecorded) (Level A), 1.2.3 Audio Description or Media Alternative (Prerecorded) (Level A), 1.2.5 Audio Description (Prerecorded) (Level AA).
  • The reading order is incorrect in some places. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence (Level A).
  • Some parts of the interface cannot be accessed via a keyboard or screen reader interaction. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 2.1.1 Keyboard (Level A).
  • There are problems with pop-ups not automatically receiving focus. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criteria 2.4.3 Focus Order (Level A).
  • Some navigation buttons do not have accessible names. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A).
  • Error messages on the Case Log screen aren’t presented to the user by assistive technologies. This fails WCAG 2.1 success criterion 4.1.3 Status Messages (Level AA).
Disproportionate burden

We aren’t claiming disproportionate burden against any of the mobile application’s accessibility problems at this time.

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations
Non-applicable criteria

Several WCAG 2.1 AA criteria do not apply to mobile applications according to the European Standard EN 301 549 ‘Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services’ (PDF) referenced by The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018. As a result, addressing these criteria isn’t in scope for this mobile application at this time.

The non-applicable WCAG 2.1 AA criteria are as follows:

  • 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A) – This relates to giving users a way to skips block of content that are repeated on multiple screens. EN 301 549 says this doesn’t apply to a single piece of software.
  • 2.4.2 Page Titled (Level A) – Mobile applications don’t have pages in the same way websites do. EN 301 549 says an app name could describe its topic or purpose but it’s not practical to make it both unique and descriptive as the WCAG criterion requires.
  • 2.4.5 Multiple Ways (Level AA) – This is supposed to allow people more than one way to get to a web page. EN 301 549 says this refers to sets of web pages and that there’s no equivalent in software.
  • 3.1.2 Language of Parts (Level AA) – On a web page this means that the code needs to point out which words are in a different language. EN 301 549 regards this as not being possible in software.
  • 3.2.3 Consistent Navigation (Level AA) – This refers to keeping navigation methods in the same order within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.
  • 3.2.4 Consistent Identification (Level AA) – This refers to keeping names for parts of page consistent within a set of web pages. EN 301 549 says sets of web pages doesn’t have an equivalent in software.

What we’re doing to improve accessibility

The University of Leeds has a Web Accessibility Project that is working towards full WCAG 2.1 AA compliance for the majority of the most-used sites within the University’s web estate.

Addressing the compliance of mobile applications falls outside the scope of this project. Nonetheless, colleagues are working to improve the compliance of all mobile applications that should be accessible as well as all websites and browser-based systems.

Preparation of this accessibility statement

This statement was prepared on 24 June 2022. It was last reviewed on 24 June 2022.

This mobile application was last tested on 21 June 2022. The test was carried out by the University of Leeds.

The testing consisted of the following:

  • Selecting a sample of screens including the main app screen, contents page, case log page, and self-text questions page. 
  • Assessing all these screens using an iPhone with iOS VoiceOver and VoiceControl.
  • Checking items on each page for colour contrast failures.
  • Checking whether the app responded to changes in device orientation.
     

Inactive apps

UniLeedsEvents

The UniLeedsEvents app is currently available for download on the Apple App Store and on Google Play but is inactive. We will not be producing an accessibility statement for the app at this time.

UniLeedsEvents was a companion app for select individual events held by the University of Leeds. All of these events have passed. There are no further plans to use the app for University events. Because the app isn’t in use there are no users to inform of any accessibility issues so we will not be producing an accessibility statement.

Apps not covered by the regulations

According to the Central Digital and Data Office (CDDO), to come within scope of accessibility regulations, a mobile app needs to be designed and developed by or on behalf of a public sector body and be intended for use by the general public. 

CDDO has advised that apps for specific defined groups, such as employees or students, are not covered by the accessibility regulations. This means some of our apps are not required to be accessible.

We appreciate our mobile applications fall under the Equality Act 2010, the Public Sector Equality Duty and the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 and, as such, all technology procured in the public sector should be accessible.

We regard the following apps as not falling under the regulations:

UniLeeds

This is an app that hasn’t been developed for the University of Leeds but is supplied with University branding. However, it is intended to be used only by the University’s students. Because of this, we understand the UniLeeds app doesn’t fall under the regulations. We don’t intended to produce an accessibility statement at this time.

Get Out. Get Active.

This is an app that’s been custom-built exclusively for the University of Leeds. However, it’s intended to be used by only University of Leeds staff and students. Because of this, we understand the Get Out. Get Active. app doesn’t fall under the regulations. We don’t intended to produce an accessibility statement at this time.

Apps regarded as archive

The regulations state that they do not apply to content of mobile applications qualifying as archives, and that archives means a mobile application that only contains content not needed for active administrative processes and not updated or edited after 23rd September 2019.

Based on this, we regard the following apps as not falling under the regulations:

pRRapid eBook

This is a paediatric medicine version of the RRapid eBook app covered previously on this page. It was last updated in December 2016 and is not needed for for active administrative processes. For these reasons this app is regarded as archive. We don’t intended to produce an accessibility statement at this time.

SeaIce

This was last updated in April 2017 and is not needed for for active administrative processes. For these reasons this app is regarded as archive. We don’t intended to produce an accessibility statement at this time.

Maxwell’s Equations App

This was last updated in November 2015 and is not needed for for active administrative processes. For these reasons this app is regarded as archive. We don’t intended to produce an accessibility statement at this time.

 

Updated: 4 July 2022